A Weary Road: Shell Shock in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1918

By Mark Osborne Humphries

© 2018

More than 16,000 Canadian soldiers suffered from shell shock during the Great War of 1914 to 1918. Despite significant interest from historians, we still know relatively little about how it was experienced, diagnosed, treated, and managed in the frontline trenches in the Canadian and British forces.

How did soldiers relate to suffering comrades? Did large numbers of shell shock cases affect the outcome of important battles? Was frontline psychiatric treatment as effective as many experts claimed after the war? Were Canadians treated any differently than other Commonwealth soldiers? A Weary Road is the first comprehensive study to address these important questions. Author Mark Osborne Humphries uses research from Canadian, British, and Australian archives, including hundreds of newly available hospital records and patient medical files, to provide a history of war trauma as it was experienced, treated, and managed by ordinary soldiers.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 504 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.6in x 9.1in
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SKU# SP003372

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2018

    From: $33.75

    Regular Price: $45.00

    ISBN 9781442644717
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2018

    From: $33.75

    Regular Price: $45.00

Quick Overview

Mark Osborne Humphries uses patient records and official army files from Canadian, British and Australian archives to examine war trauma as it was experienced, treated and managed in the frontlines of the British and Canadian forces during the First World War.

A Weary Road: Shell Shock in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1918

By Mark Osborne Humphries

© 2018

More than 16,000 Canadian soldiers suffered from shell shock during the Great War of 1914 to 1918. Despite significant interest from historians, we still know relatively little about how it was experienced, diagnosed, treated, and managed in the frontline trenches in the Canadian and British forces.

How did soldiers relate to suffering comrades? Did large numbers of shell shock cases affect the outcome of important battles? Was frontline psychiatric treatment as effective as many experts claimed after the war? Were Canadians treated any differently than other Commonwealth soldiers? A Weary Road is the first comprehensive study to address these important questions. Author Mark Osborne Humphries uses research from Canadian, British, and Australian archives, including hundreds of newly available hospital records and patient medical files, to provide a history of war trauma as it was experienced, treated, and managed by ordinary soldiers.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 504 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.6in x 9.1in
  • Reviews

    A Weary Road will greatly enhance the investigation and literature of war-related trauma and mental health issues, by providing historical context to sustained research and treatment.”


    Timothy C. Winegard, Department of History, Colorado Mesa University
  • Author Information

    Mark Osborne Humphries is the Dunkley Chair in War and the Canadian Experience, Director of the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies (LCMSDS) and an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier University.
  • Table of contents

    I. Introduction

    II. Framing Shell Shock

    III. Purely Shattered Nerves: British and Canadian Approaches to Treatment, 1914-15

    IV. Baptism of Fire: Nervous Illness in the Ypres Salient, 1915

    V. ‘I Thought the End of the World had Come’: The Shell Shock Epidemic in the Ypres Salient, Spring 1916

    VI. The Road to Blighty: Treatment of Evacuated Cases, 1915–1916

    VII. ‘Some of them had it fairly easy and some of them had it fairly hard’: The Shell Shock Crisis on the Somme, June-November 1916

    VIII. Rest and Re-Education: The Birth of Forward Psychiatric Treatment, October 1916-June 1917

    IX. Illusions of Success: The NYDN Centres, June-December 1917

    X. A Danger to Moral: Failure and Retrenchment, 1917-1918

    XI. Conclusion

    Appendices

    Bibliography