Africa: The Political Pattern

Edited by Millar MacLure and Douglas G. Anglin

© 1961

This volume contains informative and stimulating articles on the new states and modern problems of Africa. The hopes and difficulties of independence, the tensions of racial contacts, are sketched with vigour and conciseness for West, South and East Africa.

In the opening essay the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Commonwealth Relations for Nigeria, Jaja Wachuku, presents his country's special emphasis on its three important relationships: with the Commonwealth, with the United Nations and, as its largest single country, with the continent of Africa. Thomas Hodgkin considers the state systems which are developing in West Africa in response to the processes of change, and the interrelations among them. Arthur Keppel-Jones examines the interplay between racialism and republicanism in the politics of South Africa, outlining the politics and fortunes of the Nationalist and the United parties, Bryan Keith-Lucas provides a historical account of Sierra Leone before independence which clarifies the special problems this newly sovereign state must solve. Cranford Pratt analyses situations in East Africa -- Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda -- which complicate the early replacement of British rule by independent governments offering prospects of being both stable and just.

These essays were first prepared as lectures delivered in a highly successful series at Carleton University.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 72 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005638

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1961

    From: $11.96

    Regular Price: $15.95

    ISBN 9781487577322
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1961

    From: $11.96

    Regular Price: $15.95

Quick Overview

This volume contains informative and stimulating articles on the new states and modern problems of Africa. The hopes and difficulties of independence, the tensions of racial contacts, are sketched with vigour and conciseness for West, South and East Africa.

Africa: The Political Pattern

Edited by Millar MacLure and Douglas G. Anglin

© 1961

This volume contains informative and stimulating articles on the new states and modern problems of Africa. The hopes and difficulties of independence, the tensions of racial contacts, are sketched with vigour and conciseness for West, South and East Africa.

In the opening essay the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Commonwealth Relations for Nigeria, Jaja Wachuku, presents his country's special emphasis on its three important relationships: with the Commonwealth, with the United Nations and, as its largest single country, with the continent of Africa. Thomas Hodgkin considers the state systems which are developing in West Africa in response to the processes of change, and the interrelations among them. Arthur Keppel-Jones examines the interplay between racialism and republicanism in the politics of South Africa, outlining the politics and fortunes of the Nationalist and the United parties, Bryan Keith-Lucas provides a historical account of Sierra Leone before independence which clarifies the special problems this newly sovereign state must solve. Cranford Pratt analyses situations in East Africa -- Kenya, Tanganyika, Uganda -- which complicate the early replacement of British rule by independent governments offering prospects of being both stable and just.

These essays were first prepared as lectures delivered in a highly successful series at Carleton University.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 72 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    MILLAR MACLURE, Professor of English in Victoria College, University of Toronto, in the author of The Paul's Cross Sermons, 1534-1642and editor, with F.W. Watt, of Essays in English Literature from the Renaissance to the Victorian Age, Presented to A.S.P. Woodhouse. from 1960 to 1965 he was the editor of the University of Toronto Quarterly.

    Douglas G. Anglin is Professor Emeritus of Political Science. His African research interests are in conflict management and resolution, peace operations (including peacekeeping and enforcement, human rights and election monitoring), and NEPAD. He is also the patron of the Zambian Canadian Association and was a Canadian government election observer in Jos Nigeria from 12 February to 3 March 1999. Hr did a study visit to South Africa and Zambia in October 2002.

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