Athens and Jerusalem: God, Humans, and Nature

By David Novak

© 2019

What is the relation of philosophy and theology? This question has been a matter of perennial concern in the history of Western thought. Written by one of the premier philosophers in the areas of Jewish ethics and interfaith issues between Judaism and Christianity, Athens and Jerusalem contends that philosophy and theology are not mutually exclusive.

Based on the Gifford Lectures David Novak delivered at the University of Aberdeen in 2017, this book explores the commonalities and common concerns that exist between philosophy and theology on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions. Where are they different and where are they the same? And, how can they speak to one another?

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Product Details

  • Series: The Kenneth Michael Tanenbaum Series in Jewish Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 392 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006068

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2019

    From: $37.46

    Regular Price: $49.95

    ISBN 9781487524159
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    Regular Price: $125.00

    ISBN 9781487506179
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2019

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    Regular Price: $49.95

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Quick Overview

This book argues that tensions between Jewish and Christian doctrine may be lessened if texts are regarded as philosophical frameworks of exploration as opposed to ethical commitments.

Athens and Jerusalem: God, Humans, and Nature

By David Novak

© 2019

What is the relation of philosophy and theology? This question has been a matter of perennial concern in the history of Western thought. Written by one of the premier philosophers in the areas of Jewish ethics and interfaith issues between Judaism and Christianity, Athens and Jerusalem contends that philosophy and theology are not mutually exclusive.

Based on the Gifford Lectures David Novak delivered at the University of Aberdeen in 2017, this book explores the commonalities and common concerns that exist between philosophy and theology on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions. Where are they different and where are they the same? And, how can they speak to one another?

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: The Kenneth Michael Tanenbaum Series in Jewish Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 392 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "The erudition of the volume is extremely impressive, with David Novak demonstrating a magisterial grasp of the primary texts."


    Tom Angier, Department of Philosophy, University of Cape Town

    "Athens and Jerusalem is something of a philosophical tour de force. In a time when our thought tends to be as fragmented as it is specialized, it holds promise of reviving a more wholesome and robust debate about the nature of things. Professor Novak handles his subject in sophisticated fashion, engaging both primary and secondary sources on the level of a master, while providing his readers a broad education in ‘the hermeneutics of Nature.’"


    Douglas Farrow, School of Religious Studies, McGill University

    “With commanding clarity and consummate learning, Novak leads the reader through his account of how theology is no mere generic ‘talking about God’ but a comprehensive vision founded in God’s word and how philosophy in contrast is a method for thinking about such a way of being in the world. Leading the reader painstakingly through three classic accounts of how theology and philosophy might thereby relate for Jewish tradition (Plato and Philo, Aristotle and Maimonides, Kant and his modern Jewish interlocutors), Novak avers that the Kantian challenge remains unfinished business for all Jews, Christians, and Muslims who seek to expound the intersection of revelatory theology and philosophic method for today. The range and systematic insight of this volume is more than worthy of a Gifford lecturer.”
    Sarah Coakley, Fellow of the British Academy and Norris-Hulse Professor Emerita, University of Cambridge
  • Author Information

    David Novak is the J. Richard and Dorothy Shiff professor of Jewish Studies and Philosophy at the University of Toronto.
  • Table of contents

    Preface

    1. Philosophy and Theology

    2. God, Humans, and Nature

    3. Humans and Nature

    4. Philo and Plato

    5. Maimonides and Aristotle

    6. Kant’s Challenge to Theology

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index

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