Backwoods Consumers and Homespun Capitalists: The Rise of a Market Culture in Eastern Canada

Béatrice Craig

© 2009

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a local economy made up of settlers, loggers, and business people from Lower Canada, New Brunswick, and New England was established on the banks of the Upper St. John River in an area known as the Madawaska Territory. This newly created economy was visibly part of the Atlantic capitalist system yet different in several major ways.

In Backwoods Consumers and Homespun Capitalists, Béatrice Craig examines and describes this economy from its origins in the native fur trade, the growth of exportable wheat, the selling of food to new settlers, and of ton timbre to Britain. Craig vividly portrays the role of wives who sold homespun fabric and clothing to farmers, loggers, and river drivers, helping to bolster the community. The construction of saw, grist, and carding mills, and the establishment of stores, boarding houses, and taverns are all viewed as steps in the development of what the author calls "homespun capitalists." The territory also participated in the Atlantic economy as a consumer of Canadian, British, European, west and east Indian and American goods. This case study offers a unique examination of the emergence of capitalism and of a consumer society in a small, relatively remote community in the backwoods of New Brunswick.

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  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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  • PUBLISHED MAY 2016

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    Regular Price: $37.95

    ISBN 9781487521486
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2009

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    Regular Price: $90.00

    ISBN 9780802093172
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2009

    From: $32.26

    Regular Price: $37.95

Quick Overview

Craig examines and describes the local economy of the Madawaska Territory from its origins in the native fur trade, the growth of exportable wheat, the selling of food to new settlers, and of ton timbre to Britain.

Backwoods Consumers and Homespun Capitalists: The Rise of a Market Culture in Eastern Canada

Béatrice Craig

© 2009

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a local economy made up of settlers, loggers, and business people from Lower Canada, New Brunswick, and New England was established on the banks of the Upper St. John River in an area known as the Madawaska Territory. This newly created economy was visibly part of the Atlantic capitalist system yet different in several major ways.

In Backwoods Consumers and Homespun Capitalists, Béatrice Craig examines and describes this economy from its origins in the native fur trade, the growth of exportable wheat, the selling of food to new settlers, and of ton timbre to Britain. Craig vividly portrays the role of wives who sold homespun fabric and clothing to farmers, loggers, and river drivers, helping to bolster the community. The construction of saw, grist, and carding mills, and the establishment of stores, boarding houses, and taverns are all viewed as steps in the development of what the author calls "homespun capitalists." The territory also participated in the Atlantic economy as a consumer of Canadian, British, European, west and east Indian and American goods. This case study offers a unique examination of the emergence of capitalism and of a consumer society in a small, relatively remote community in the backwoods of New Brunswick.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Craig paints an impressive and richly detailed portrait of social and economic development in a remote rural region. This is an exhaustive case study that distills immense mass of archival material, representing many years of research into a clear and convincing picture of a fascinating frontier.
    Leslie Choquette
    Business History Review, vol 84:01:10

    ‘Craig’s is an important book, a very significant contribution to the literature and a must-read for economic and social historians of all periods and places, pre-Confederation Canadian specialists, and graduate students.’
    Julia Roberts
    labour/le Travail, vol 68: 2011

    ‘Craig’s impressive and detailed account places local markets at the center but, importantly, also shows that links to international markets were by no means inconsequential.’


    Robert B. Kristofferson
    American Historical Review

    ‘Debunking myths of regional backwardness, Craig shows how local people made rational choices to limit their exposure to volatile export industries by focusing instead on agricultural strategies that offered economic diversification and mitigated risk.’


    Jerry Bannister
    Acadiensis
  • Author Information

    Béatrice Craig is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Ottawa.

  • Prizes

    Clio Prize for the Atlantic region awarded by Canadian Historical Association - Winner in 2010
    Prix Lionel-Groulx awarded by l'Institut d'histoire de l'Amérique française - Winner in 2010
    Sir John A. Macdonald Prize awarded by Canadian Historical Association - Winner in 2010
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