Between History and Tomorrow: Making and Breaking Everyday Life in Rural Newfoundland

By Gerald Sider

© 2003

The first edition of this work, Culture and Class in Anthropology and History: A Newfoundland Illustration (Cambridge University Press, 1986), published before the 1992 moratorium on cod fishing, focused on the inshore, small-boat, village-based cod fishery that flourished from the early 19th century to the mid-20th, when it increasingly gave way to a factory-based, open ocean, deep-sea trawler fishery. The purpose of the first edition was to use the village fishery as a doorway into the logic of merchant capital. In its general features, merchant capital was both the fundamental form of economic, political, and social organization in Newfoundland and more--it was the predominant political-economic form for much of the world.

Since the moratorium, the situation in rural Newfoundland has become so stark, and the multiple and discordant histories that are being shaped so divergent, pulling people apart from one another even within families, that it provides a chance to see history happening: to people, to communities, and to capital. The spaces that are developing between those who are and those who are not "making it" since the demise of the cod fishery are vast, and the struggles of people to survive and to succeed in the new situation are meeting with highly diverse outcomes.  They enable us to see how both difference and inequality are made, how they are transformed, how they are used, and how people living within, and necessarily also against, these new inequalities reshape the world more profoundly than they seem to have first intended. To introduce the conceptual framework for that task is the special purpose of this second edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 344 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 9.0in
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SKU# HE000019

  • PUBLISHED SEP 2003

    From: $29.71

    Regular Price: $34.95

    ISBN 9781551115177

Quick Overview

"This is what anthropology should be and the way ethnography should be done." - Gavin Smith, University of Toronto

Between History and Tomorrow: Making and Breaking Everyday Life in Rural Newfoundland

By Gerald Sider

© 2003

The first edition of this work, Culture and Class in Anthropology and History: A Newfoundland Illustration (Cambridge University Press, 1986), published before the 1992 moratorium on cod fishing, focused on the inshore, small-boat, village-based cod fishery that flourished from the early 19th century to the mid-20th, when it increasingly gave way to a factory-based, open ocean, deep-sea trawler fishery. The purpose of the first edition was to use the village fishery as a doorway into the logic of merchant capital. In its general features, merchant capital was both the fundamental form of economic, political, and social organization in Newfoundland and more--it was the predominant political-economic form for much of the world.

Since the moratorium, the situation in rural Newfoundland has become so stark, and the multiple and discordant histories that are being shaped so divergent, pulling people apart from one another even within families, that it provides a chance to see history happening: to people, to communities, and to capital. The spaces that are developing between those who are and those who are not "making it" since the demise of the cod fishery are vast, and the struggles of people to survive and to succeed in the new situation are meeting with highly diverse outcomes.  They enable us to see how both difference and inequality are made, how they are transformed, how they are used, and how people living within, and necessarily also against, these new inequalities reshape the world more profoundly than they seem to have first intended. To introduce the conceptual framework for that task is the special purpose of this second edition.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 344 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    The publication of Culture and Class in Anthropology and History: A Newfoundland Illustration gave rise to an entirely new undertaking in the way anthropologists would seek to understand…the processes by which the power of culture and the culture of power engender differentiations and inequalities. With this new edition, readers from every discipline in the social sciences and humanities will once again be able to experience its unmatched threading of vital ethnography with bold and unfolding theory. This is what anthropology should be and the way ethnography should be done. So beautiful is the writing in A Newfoundland Illustration that its theoretical ambitions will not deter anybody interested in that enigmatic place and its people.


    Gavin Smith, University of Toronto

    Gerald Sider's eyes for the gesture or expression that reveals the system is unerring, devastating, and yet compassionate.


    Rhys Isaac, Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for History

    Between History and Tomorrow is a fascinating work that addresses a particular cultural/environmental issue, but in a way that speaks to a global phenomenon of which we are only becoming aware. Sider raises questions about Newfoundland culture that are vital to those local communities, but he also raises questions for academic thinking about culture that are equally vital future thinking and inquiry both in anthropology and history. That the book raises more questions than it is able to answer completely only points to the significance of this work.


    - Hans M. Carlson, The American Review of Canadian Studies
  • Author Information

    Gerald Sider is Professor of Anthropology at the College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology (Honorary), at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He is Co-Editor, With Kirk Dombrowski, of the series of ethnographic case studies of native political struggles: Fourth World Rising: Native People's Necessary and Chosen Struggles (University of Nebraska Press).

  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements for the second edition
    Acknowledgements for the first edition
    Map of Newfoundland
    Map of the Bonavista Peninsula

    Prologue: Living within and against today: towards an anthropology of vulnerable lives

    PART ONE: Introductions
    1. Anthropology and history, culture and class
    2. The particularity and relevance of Newfoundland
    3. Autonomy and the harness: the logic of merchant capital

    PART TWO: Domination, alliances, and descent
    4. Regale and rule: the logic of paternalism and the emergence of village culture
    5. When fishermen may starve: the Slade and Kelson Plan of 1825
    6. The times of our lives: descent, alliances, custom, and history

    PART THREE: The politics of subsistence production: hegemony at work in a collapsing state
    7. The memorial of the merchants of Poole
    8. A political holiday
    9. We may live in hopes

    CONCLUSION:
    10. Merchant capital and the cross-handed triumphs of tradition

    EPILOGUE: When localities implode: social reproduction in the midst of near total unemployment.

    References
    Index

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