Beyond the Nation?: Immigrants' Local Lives in Transnational Cultures

Edited by Alexander Freund

© 2012

Beyond the Nation? explores the lives of German-Canadian immigrants between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries — from the Moravian missionaries who came to Labrador in the 1770s to the German refugees who arrived in Canada after the Second World War. Internationally renowned historians of migration — including Dirk Hoerder and the late Christiane Harzig — detail these German-Canadians' experiences of immigration by investigating their imagined communities and collective memories.

Beyond the Nation? outlines how German-Canadians invented ethnicity under Canadian expectations, and provides moving case studies of how notable immigrant groups integrated into Canadian society. Other topics explored include literary constructions of German-Canadian identity, analyses of language use among these immigrants, and aspects of their lives that can be interpreted as transcultural and gendered. Transcending the master narrative of immigration as nation building, Beyond the Nation? charts a new course for immigration studies.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.1in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP003083

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2012

    From: $57.75

    Regular Price: $77.00

    ISBN 9781442642782
  • PUBLISHED OCT 2012

    From: $57.75

    Regular Price: $77.00

Quick Overview

Beyond the Nation? outlines how German-Canadians invented ethnicity under Canadian expectations, and provides moving case studies of how notable immigrant groups integrated into Canadian society.

Beyond the Nation?: Immigrants' Local Lives in Transnational Cultures

Edited by Alexander Freund

© 2012

Beyond the Nation? explores the lives of German-Canadian immigrants between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries — from the Moravian missionaries who came to Labrador in the 1770s to the German refugees who arrived in Canada after the Second World War. Internationally renowned historians of migration — including Dirk Hoerder and the late Christiane Harzig — detail these German-Canadians' experiences of immigration by investigating their imagined communities and collective memories.

Beyond the Nation? outlines how German-Canadians invented ethnicity under Canadian expectations, and provides moving case studies of how notable immigrant groups integrated into Canadian society. Other topics explored include literary constructions of German-Canadian identity, analyses of language use among these immigrants, and aspects of their lives that can be interpreted as transcultural and gendered. Transcending the master narrative of immigration as nation building, Beyond the Nation? charts a new course for immigration studies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.1in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘This volume opens up important questions not just for the Canadian immigrant context and should be read by immigration scholars of different ethnic groups, periods, and world regions.’


    Stefan Manz
    Society for German-American Studies, vol 47:2013

    ‘Well written, grounded in solid research, and innovative in approach and perspective. Students in migration history, women’s and gender history, and in history of borders and borderlands would greatly benefit from reading this volume.’


    Yukari
    Labour/Le Travail vol 77 spring 2016

    ‘This collection sets the standard against which future scholarship on German-Canadians’ transnational experiences will be measured. Featuring contributions from the current leaders in the field, Beyond the Nation? addresses a wide range of central themes using the highest standards of academic rigour. Anyone interested in German-Canadian matters will want this often riveting, immensely readable, and at times moving book for ready reference and enjoyable browsing.’
    Manfred Prokop, Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies, University of Alberta
  • Author Information

    Alexander Freund is an associate professor in the Department of History and the Chair in German-Canadian Studies at the University of Winnipeg.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction
    Alexander Freund

    Part I: Approaches: Transculturalism and Gender

    Local, Continental, Global Migration Contexts: Projecting Life-courses in the Frame of Family Economies and Emotional Networks
    Dirk Hoerder

    Gender in German-Canadian Studies: Challenges from Across the Borders
    Christiane Harzig

    Part II: 18th and 19th Centuries: Religion, Politics and Culture

    The Beginnings of the Moravian Mission in Labrador, 1771-1775
    Kerstin Boelkow

    Model Farmers, Dubious Citizens: Reconsidering the Pennsylvania Germans of Upper Canada, 1786-1834
    Ross D. Fair

    Germania in Canada – Nation and Ethnicity at the German Peace Jubilees of 1871
    Barbara Lorenzkowski

    A Weak Woman Standing Alone: Home, Nation and Gender in the Work of German-Canadian Immigration Agent Elise von Koerber, 1872-1884
    Angelika E. Sauer

    Part III: 20th Century: Ethnicity and Nationalism

    German-Quebecers, "German-Québécois", German-Canadians? The Double Integration of People of German Descent in Quebec
    Manuel Meune

    'What Church do you go to?' The Difficult Acculturation of German-Jewish Refugees in Canada, 1933-2004
    Patrick Farges

    'German Only in Their Hearts:' Making and Breaking the Ethnic German Diaspora in the 20th Century
    Hans Werner

    Germans into Europeans: Expellees in Post-war Canada
    Pascal Maeder

    Part IV: Literature and Language

    Language Use and Language Acculturation: German Speakers in Kitchener-Waterloo
    Grit Liebscher and Mathias Schulze

    Re-Imagining German-Canadians: Reflections on Past Deconstructions and Literary Evidence
    Myka Burke

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