Social Theory: Issues of Race and Ethnicity in a Post-Colonial World

Two weeks ago, we posted an excerpt from our forthcoming reader, Social Theory: Continuity and Confrontation, highlighting the “legacy readings” that define the “Classical Theory” section of the book. Last week, we posted an excerpt from the “Transitions and Changes” section of the book, introducing the concept of “transitional giants”—theorists such as Foucault and Bourdieu who built bridges between earlier theories and the theories of the present.

Social Theory 3eThis week, we’d like to feature an excerpt from a chapter that is entirely new to the third edition of this popular social theory reader. “Chapter 13: Issues of Race and Ethnicity in a Post-Colonial World” represents a significant addition to this thoroughly revised book.

Readings in the new chapter include:

13.1 Frantz Fanon (1925–1961)
Fanon and the Racial and Colonial Divides
Reading 13.1: Excerpts from Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth (1961)

13.2 Edward Saïd (1935–2003)
Edward Saïd: Orientalism and the Other
Reading 13.2: Excerpts from Saïd’s Orientalism (1978)

13.3 Michael Omi and Howard Winant
New Ways of Theorizing Race: Omi and Winant’s Racial Formation in the United States (1986)
Reading 13.3: Excerpts from Omi and Winant’s Racial Formation in the United States (1986)

13.4 David Roediger (1952–)
David Roediger’s The Wages of Whiteness (1991)
Reading 13.4: Roediger’s The Wages of Whiteness (1991)

In the reader, the new chapter on race and ethnicity is followed by a substantially updated chapter on gender and sexuality, which is in turn followed by a brand new chapter on culture. The final two chapters in the book focus on media and globalization, rounding out an amazing section (“Dispersion and Difference”) that should keep students engaged and help remind them of the contemporary relevance of social theory.

Download the introduction to Chapter 13: Issues of Race and Ethnicity in a Post-Colonial World.

To find out more about the third edition of the reader, click here.

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