Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs: 1998

Mutimer, David

© 2004

Long praised for its accuracy, readability, and insight, the Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs offers a synoptic appraisal of the year's developments in Canadian politics.

In 1998, Canada came to terms with the aftermath of the 1997 election. While the debate in the election turned from the distribution of the surplus to the abiding question of national unity, the return of the Liberal government seemed to quiet both. Regarding the latter, however, the Supreme Court advised that neither Canadian nor international law conferred on Quebec the right to secede unilaterally from Canada unless a clear majority in Quebec opted for separation in a referendum with a clear question. The conservative vote splitting that occurred in the 1997 election led Reform Party leader Preston Manning to try to convince his party of the need for a 'united alternative' in 1998, but the election of former Prime Minister Joe Clark as Tory leader raised a difficult hurdle for such a union.

The Canadian Annual Review is unique in its collection and presentation of the year in politics. Between the calendar and the text, it is an easy-access reference for events, both federal and provincial.

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Product Details

  • Series: Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.2in x 9.6in
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SKU# SP002168

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2005

    From: $102.75

    Regular Price: $137.00

    ISBN 9780802089267
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2005

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    Regular Price: $158.00

Quick Overview

Featuring essays on parliament and politics, Ottawa and the provinces, and external affairs, the Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs provides a comprehensive account of the year’s events.

Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs: 1998

Mutimer, David

© 2004

Long praised for its accuracy, readability, and insight, the Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs offers a synoptic appraisal of the year's developments in Canadian politics.

In 1998, Canada came to terms with the aftermath of the 1997 election. While the debate in the election turned from the distribution of the surplus to the abiding question of national unity, the return of the Liberal government seemed to quiet both. Regarding the latter, however, the Supreme Court advised that neither Canadian nor international law conferred on Quebec the right to secede unilaterally from Canada unless a clear majority in Quebec opted for separation in a referendum with a clear question. The conservative vote splitting that occurred in the 1997 election led Reform Party leader Preston Manning to try to convince his party of the need for a 'united alternative' in 1998, but the election of former Prime Minister Joe Clark as Tory leader raised a difficult hurdle for such a union.

The Canadian Annual Review is unique in its collection and presentation of the year in politics. Between the calendar and the text, it is an easy-access reference for events, both federal and provincial.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.2in x 9.6in
  • Author Information

    David Mutimer is a professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at York University.

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