Children in English Society Volume I: From Tudor Times to the Eighteenth Century

By Ivy Pinchbeck and Margaret Hewitt

© 1969

The considerable social concern and statutory provision for the care and welfare of children is a remarkable feature of mid-twentieth century English society. It is not however a unique achievement of the present age -- children certainly loomed large in the paternalistic legislation of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and were regarded as an important part of the social structure and valuable assets of the commonwealth.
The present volume represents the first half of a study of the social concern for children in England from the Tudor paternalism of the mid-sixteenth century to the legislation of the Welfare State in the mid-twentieth century. In it, the authors analyse various aspects of Tudor policy concerning children and discuss the ways in which later generations deliberately or unconsciously modified these policies. They show how, as a result of changed social attitudes, the failure to provide adequately for the welfare of children was again by the end of the eighteenth century becoming a matter of increasing concern among thinking people and prompted a renewal of local and voluntary efforts to solve what had become urgent national problems.
The companion volume will deal with the attempts made by nineteenth-century reformers to remedy some of the problems caused by urbanisation and rapid increase in population, and also with twentieth-century social provision for the child. Together, these two volumes will be a significant addition to the literature of historical sociology in which social attitudes to childhood and to children so far been largely neglected.
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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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  • PUBLISHED DEC 1969

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The present volume represents the first half of a study of the social concern for children in England from the Tudor paternalism of the mid-sixteenth century to the legislation of the Welfare State in the mid-twentieth century.

Children in English Society Volume I: From Tudor Times to the Eighteenth Century

By Ivy Pinchbeck and Margaret Hewitt

© 1969

The considerable social concern and statutory provision for the care and welfare of children is a remarkable feature of mid-twentieth century English society. It is not however a unique achievement of the present age -- children certainly loomed large in the paternalistic legislation of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and were regarded as an important part of the social structure and valuable assets of the commonwealth.
The present volume represents the first half of a study of the social concern for children in England from the Tudor paternalism of the mid-sixteenth century to the legislation of the Welfare State in the mid-twentieth century. In it, the authors analyse various aspects of Tudor policy concerning children and discuss the ways in which later generations deliberately or unconsciously modified these policies. They show how, as a result of changed social attitudes, the failure to provide adequately for the welfare of children was again by the end of the eighteenth century becoming a matter of increasing concern among thinking people and prompted a renewal of local and voluntary efforts to solve what had become urgent national problems.
The companion volume will deal with the attempts made by nineteenth-century reformers to remedy some of the problems caused by urbanisation and rapid increase in population, and also with twentieth-century social provision for the child. Together, these two volumes will be a significant addition to the literature of historical sociology in which social attitudes to childhood and to children so far been largely neglected.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Ivy Pinchbeck was until recently Reader in Social Studies at Bedford College, University of London, and has since been a Governor of the College. In 1961 she was appointed to a Research Fellowship by the Trustees of the Nuffield Foundation to enable her to give her whole time to the completion of research for this book. Dr. Pinchbeck is the author of Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution (reissued Frank Cass, 1969), originally published in 1930 and still the standard work on the subject.

    Margaret Hewitt is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Exeter. She is a Governor of Bedford College, London, and a member of the Council of Church Colleges of Education. Dr. Hewitt's previous book was Wives and Mothers in Victorian Industry (Rockliff, 1958).

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