Collective Care: Indigenous Motherhood, Family, and HIV/AIDS

By Pamela J. Downe

© 2020

Collective Care provides an ethnographic account of urban Indigenous life and caregiving practices in the face of Saskatchewan’s HIV epidemic. Based on a five-year study conducted in partnership with AIDS Saskatoon, the book focuses on the contrast between Indigenous values of collective kin-care and non-Indigenous models of intensive maternal care. It explores how women and men negotiate the forces of HIV to render motherhood a site of cultural meaning, personal and collective well-being, and, sometimes, individual and community despair. It also introduces readers to how HIV is Indigenized in western Canada and how all HIV-affected and -infected mothers must negotiate this cultural and racialized terrain.

Featuring in-depth narrative interviews, notes from participant observation in AIDS Saskatoon’s drop-in centre, and a photovoice component, this book offers an accessible account of an engaged anthropologist’s work with a community that is both vulnerable and resilient. Each chapter begins with an ethnographic vignette that introduces central concepts, including medical anthropology, syndemics, kinship, and Indigeneity, with the overall aim of humanizing those affected by HIV in western Canada and beyond.

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Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 176 pages
  • Illustrations: 9
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# HE000794

  • AVAILABLE JAN 2021
    From: $26.95
    ISBN 9781487587635
  • AVAILABLE FEB 2021

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781487587642
  • AVAILABLE MAR 2021
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Quick Overview

This engaging ethnography explores how Indigenous women and their communities practice collective care to sustain traditional lifeways in what has been called Canada’s "HIV hot zone."

Collective Care: Indigenous Motherhood, Family, and HIV/AIDS

By Pamela J. Downe

© 2020

Collective Care provides an ethnographic account of urban Indigenous life and caregiving practices in the face of Saskatchewan’s HIV epidemic. Based on a five-year study conducted in partnership with AIDS Saskatoon, the book focuses on the contrast between Indigenous values of collective kin-care and non-Indigenous models of intensive maternal care. It explores how women and men negotiate the forces of HIV to render motherhood a site of cultural meaning, personal and collective well-being, and, sometimes, individual and community despair. It also introduces readers to how HIV is Indigenized in western Canada and how all HIV-affected and -infected mothers must negotiate this cultural and racialized terrain.

Featuring in-depth narrative interviews, notes from participant observation in AIDS Saskatoon’s drop-in centre, and a photovoice component, this book offers an accessible account of an engaged anthropologist’s work with a community that is both vulnerable and resilient. Each chapter begins with an ethnographic vignette that introduces central concepts, including medical anthropology, syndemics, kinship, and Indigeneity, with the overall aim of humanizing those affected by HIV in western Canada and beyond.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 176 pages
  • Illustrations: 9
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "By sharing perspectives that are often ignored, this work provides important insight not found elsewhere. The reliance on the words of Indigenous women is a wonderful example of the kind of allyship we have been calling for. Rather than speaking for the women, Pamela J. Downe has created a literary space where they can speak for themselves. The truth of their stories comes through in vibrant quotes about loving and raising children in a collective way."


    Dawn Lavell-Harvard, Director of the First Peoples House of Learning, Trent University, and former President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

    "Collective Care icontributes to our understanding of Indigenous family life and the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS. Because the book focuses on family relationships and care in a context that is somewhat familiar to students, yet different from more frequently studied communities with HIV/AIDS. This book will be a useful tool for teaching."


    William McKellin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
  • Author Information

    Pamela J. Downe is an associate professor in the Department of Archaeology & Anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan and past-president of the Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA).
  • Table of contents

    Preface
    Chapter 1: Beginning
    Chapter 2: Family
    Chapter 3: Motherhood
    Chapter 4: Fatherhood
    Chapter 5: Loss
    Chapter 6: Love
    Chapter 7: Closing
    References

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