Constitution-Making: Principles, Process, Practice

By Edward McWhinney

© 1981

In response to the general crisis in law and society in contemporary western and communist nations alike, and to the need for new relations between man and the state, Professor McWhinney presents a comparative study of constitutions and constitution-making.
This book begins with a discussion of constitutional government in western societies – the United States, France, Germany, and Great Britain – the challenges it faces, its philosophy, and its practice. It then draws comparisons to major non-western societies such as Japan and India and to the major powers of the communist world – the Soviet Union and China.
McWhinney discusses in detail the essential aspects of constitution-making – when, why, and by whom it is done, as well as the art of drafting a constitution. He presents the various options: presidential executive or government by assembly, centralization or decentralization, the rule of law and emergency powers, the open society and affirmative action, and direct and indirect elections. All are examined against an empirical record of the experience of major countries.
In conclusion, McWhinney enquires into the claimed socio-economic limits to contemporary constitutionalism, its alleged western ethnocentricity, and the effective political limits to constitutional government today. He offers canons of prudence for contemporary constitution-making.
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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 248 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.5in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP005794

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1981

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

    ISBN 9781487579029
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1981

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

Quick Overview

In response to the general crisis in law and society in contemporary western and communist nations alike, and to the need for new relations between man and the state, Professor McWhinney presents a comparative study of constitutions and constitution-making.

Constitution-Making: Principles, Process, Practice

By Edward McWhinney

© 1981

In response to the general crisis in law and society in contemporary western and communist nations alike, and to the need for new relations between man and the state, Professor McWhinney presents a comparative study of constitutions and constitution-making.
This book begins with a discussion of constitutional government in western societies – the United States, France, Germany, and Great Britain – the challenges it faces, its philosophy, and its practice. It then draws comparisons to major non-western societies such as Japan and India and to the major powers of the communist world – the Soviet Union and China.
McWhinney discusses in detail the essential aspects of constitution-making – when, why, and by whom it is done, as well as the art of drafting a constitution. He presents the various options: presidential executive or government by assembly, centralization or decentralization, the rule of law and emergency powers, the open society and affirmative action, and direct and indirect elections. All are examined against an empirical record of the experience of major countries.
In conclusion, McWhinney enquires into the claimed socio-economic limits to contemporary constitutionalism, its alleged western ethnocentricity, and the effective political limits to constitutional government today. He offers canons of prudence for contemporary constitution-making.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 248 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.5in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    PROFESSOR EDWARD McWHINNEY of the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto has been an Assistant Professor at Yale University; and also a Visiting Professor at New York University, at the Ecole Libre des Hautes Etudes, and at the Max-Planck-Institut (Volkerrecht) in Heidelberg. He has also been a Legal Consultant to the United Nations. He is author of Judicial Review in the English-Speaking World, now in its second edition, and of Constitutionalism in Germany; he was also Editor and contributor to the symposium volume Canadian Jurisprudence. He has published many articles in such journals as the Harvard Law Review, the American Journal of Internal Law, the Revue Internatinoale de Droit Compare, the Archiv fur Rechts und Sozialphilosphie. He is a contributor to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

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