Corporate Social Responsibility and Canada’s Role in Africa’s Extractive Sectors

Edited by Nathan Andrews and J. Andrew Grant

© 2019

Africa’s natural resource sectors are experiencing unprecedented levels of foreign investment and production. Hailed as a means of reducing poverty and reliance on foreign aid, the role of foreign corporations in Africa’s extractive sector is not well understood and important questions remain about the impact of such activities on people and on the environment.

With reference to global governance initiatives aimed at promoting ethical business practices, this volume offers a timely examination of Canada-Africa relations and natural resource governance. Few Canadians realize how significant a role their country plays in investing in Africa’s natural resource sector. The editors and contributors consider the interplay between public opinion, corporate social responsibility, and debates about the extraction and trade of Africa’s natural resources.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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Quick Overview

With reference to global governance initiatives aimed at promoting ethical business practices, this volume offers a timely examination of Canada-Africa relations and natural resource governance.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Canada’s Role in Africa’s Extractive Sectors

Edited by Nathan Andrews and J. Andrew Grant

© 2019

Africa’s natural resource sectors are experiencing unprecedented levels of foreign investment and production. Hailed as a means of reducing poverty and reliance on foreign aid, the role of foreign corporations in Africa’s extractive sector is not well understood and important questions remain about the impact of such activities on people and on the environment.

With reference to global governance initiatives aimed at promoting ethical business practices, this volume offers a timely examination of Canada-Africa relations and natural resource governance. Few Canadians realize how significant a role their country plays in investing in Africa’s natural resource sector. The editors and contributors consider the interplay between public opinion, corporate social responsibility, and debates about the extraction and trade of Africa’s natural resources.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Nathan Andrews is Assistant Professor in the Department of Global & International Studies at the University of Northern British Columbia.


    J. Andrew Grant is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University.
  • Table of contents

    Section I – Introduction: Conceptual Approaches and Policy Implications
    1. Africa-Canada Relations in Natural Resource Sectors: Approaches to (and Prospects for) Corporate Social Responsibility, Good Governance, and Human Security – Nathan Andrews, University of Northern British Columbia and J. Andrew Grant, Queen’s University

    Section II – Canada in Africa: From the Global to the Local (and Back)
    2. Canadian Government and Corporate Social Responsibility: Implications for Sustainable Development in Africa – Uwafiokun Idemudia, York University; W. R. Nadège Compaoré, York University & Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR); and Cynthia Kwakyewah, Tony Elumelu Foundation
    3. Corporate Social Responsibility and Canada’s Role in Africa’s Extractive Industries: A Critical Analysis – Nketti Johnston-Taylor, United Way Calgary
    4. Canadian Perspectives on the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights in Africa: Assessing the Legitimacy of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives in Extractive Sectors – Charis Enns, University of Sheffield & Aga Khan University, Kenya
    5. The Impact of the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights on Corporate Social Responsibility Policies: An Assessment of Canadian Mining Firms – Jason J. McSparren, University of Massachusetts, Boston
    6. Natural Resource Governance and Human Security: What has Canada got to do with Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining in Africa? – Timothy Adivilah Balag’kutu, University of Massachusetts, Boston

    Section III – Corporate Social Responsibility, Norms, and Development
    7. Global Governance via Local Procurement? Interrogating the Promotion of Local Procurement as a Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy – Paula Butler, Wilfrid Laurier University
    8. Examining the Dynamics of Global Corporate Social Responsibility Frameworks and Canadian Mining Firms: Insights from Ghana and South Africa – Raynold Wonder Alorse, Queen’s University
    9. ‘Golden’ Expectations: Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance in South Africa’s Mining Sector – David Orr, University of Cambridge
    10. A Natural Resource Boon or Impending Doom in East Africa? Political Settlements and Governance Dynamics in Uganda’s Oil Sector – Shingirai Taodzera, University of Ottawa

    Section IV – Concluding Remarks: Reflections on Corporate Social Responsibility, Legitimacy, and Africa-Canada Relations in Natural Resource Sectors
    11. Corporate Social Responsibility and Issues of Legitimacy and Development: Reflections on the Mining Sector in Africa – Bonnie Campbell, Université du Québec à Montréal
    12. Reflections on Africa-Canada Relations in Natural Resource Sectors in the 2020s – J. Andrew Grant, Queen’s University and Nathan Andrews, University of Northern British Columbia