Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal: Cultural Practices and Decolonization in Canada

Julia V. Emberley

© 2007

From the Canadian Indian Act to Freud's Totem and Taboo to films such as Nanook of the North, all manner of cultural artefacts have been used to create a distinction between savagery and civilization. In Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal, Julia V. Emberley examines the historical production of aboriginality in colonial cultural practices and its impact on the everyday lives of indigenous women, youth, and children.

Adopting a materialist-semiotic approach, Emberley explores the ways in which representational technologies - film, photography, and print culture, including legal documents and literature - were crucial to British colonial practices. Many indigenous scholars, writers, and artists, however, have confounded these practices by deploying aboriginality as a complex and enabling sign of social, cultural, and political transformation. Emberley gives due attention to this important work, studying a wide range of topics such as race, place, and motherhood, primitivism and violence, and sexuality and global political kinships. Her multidisciplinary approach ensures that Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal will be of interest to scholars and students of cultural studies, indigenous studies, women's studies, postcolonial and colonial studies, literature, and film.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Illustrations: 23
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP002345

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2009

    From: $32.96

    Regular Price: $43.95

    ISBN 9781442610255
  • PUBLISHED DEC 2007

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    Regular Price: $99.00

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In Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal, Julia V. Emberley examines the historical production of aboriginality in colonial cultural practices and its impact on the everyday lives of indigenous women, youth, and children.

Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal: Cultural Practices and Decolonization in Canada

Julia V. Emberley

© 2007

From the Canadian Indian Act to Freud's Totem and Taboo to films such as Nanook of the North, all manner of cultural artefacts have been used to create a distinction between savagery and civilization. In Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal, Julia V. Emberley examines the historical production of aboriginality in colonial cultural practices and its impact on the everyday lives of indigenous women, youth, and children.

Adopting a materialist-semiotic approach, Emberley explores the ways in which representational technologies - film, photography, and print culture, including legal documents and literature - were crucial to British colonial practices. Many indigenous scholars, writers, and artists, however, have confounded these practices by deploying aboriginality as a complex and enabling sign of social, cultural, and political transformation. Emberley gives due attention to this important work, studying a wide range of topics such as race, place, and motherhood, primitivism and violence, and sexuality and global political kinships. Her multidisciplinary approach ensures that Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal will be of interest to scholars and students of cultural studies, indigenous studies, women's studies, postcolonial and colonial studies, literature, and film.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Illustrations: 23
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Julia V. Emberley is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Western Ontario.

  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations

    Preface

    Introduction: Of Soft and Savage Bodies in the Colonial Domestic Archive

    An Origin Story of No Origins: Biopolitics and Race in the Geographies of the Maternal Body

    The Spatial Politics of Homosocial Colonial Desire in Robert Flaherty's Nanook of the North

    Originary Violence and the Spectre of the Primordial Father: A Biotextual Reassemblage

    Post/Colonial Masculinities: The Primitive Duality of 'ma, ma, man' in Pat Barker's Regeneration Trilogy

    The Family in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Aboriginality in the Photographic Archive

    Inuit Mother Disappeared: The Police in the Archive, 1940-1949

    The Possibility of Justice in the Child's Body: Rudy Wiebe and Yvonne Johnson's Stolen Life: The Journey of a Cree Woman

    Genealogies of Difference: Revamping the Empire? Or, Queering Kinship in a Transnational Decolonial Frame

    Conclusion: De-signifying Kinship

    Notes
    Bibliography
    Illustration Credits
    Index

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