Desiring Canada: CBC Contests, Hockey Violence, and Other Stately Pleasures

By Patricia Cormack and James F. Cosgrave

© 2012

What do Tim Hortons, Hockey Night in Canada, and Rick Mercer have in common? Each is a popular symbol of Canadian identity, seen across the country – and beyond – on television and in other forms of media. But whose definition of ‘Canadian’ do they represent? What does it mean to be Canadian? Do we create our own impressions of Canadian identity, or are they created for us? In Desiring Canada, Patricia Cormack and James F. Cosgrave delve into these questions, exploring the connections between popular culture, media, and the Canadian state.

Taking as their examples the popular CBC contests, Tim Hortons advertising campaigns, NHL hockey violence, television comedy, and the business of gambling, this lively, engaging book investigates the relationship between some of our more beloved popular expressions of national identity and the extent to which the interests of the state appeal in various ways through the popular media to the pleasures of citizens, thus shaping our understanding of what it means to be Canadian.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003501

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2013

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

    ISBN 9781442613911
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2013

    From: $28.86

    Regular Price: $33.95

Quick Overview

This lively, engaging book investigates the relationship between some of our more beloved popular expressions of national identity and the extent to which the interests of the state appeal to the pleasures of citizens, thus shaping our understanding of what it means to be Canadian.

Desiring Canada: CBC Contests, Hockey Violence, and Other Stately Pleasures

By Patricia Cormack and James F. Cosgrave

© 2012

What do Tim Hortons, Hockey Night in Canada, and Rick Mercer have in common? Each is a popular symbol of Canadian identity, seen across the country – and beyond – on television and in other forms of media. But whose definition of ‘Canadian’ do they represent? What does it mean to be Canadian? Do we create our own impressions of Canadian identity, or are they created for us? In Desiring Canada, Patricia Cormack and James F. Cosgrave delve into these questions, exploring the connections between popular culture, media, and the Canadian state.

Taking as their examples the popular CBC contests, Tim Hortons advertising campaigns, NHL hockey violence, television comedy, and the business of gambling, this lively, engaging book investigates the relationship between some of our more beloved popular expressions of national identity and the extent to which the interests of the state appeal in various ways through the popular media to the pleasures of citizens, thus shaping our understanding of what it means to be Canadian.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Desiring Canada offers a new and useful way to think about how our identifications with Canada are produced through popular cultural texts, artefacts, and performances that are state-mediated. Persuasively argued and well-grounded in familiar aspects of the Canadian cultural landscape, it will surely appeal to educated readers concerned with all things Canadian.’
    Maurice Charland, Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University
  • Author Information

    Patricia Cormack is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at St Francis Xavier University.



    James F. Cosgrave is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Trent University.

  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction

    Chapter One: Contesting Canada at the CBC

    Chapter Two: “Always Fresh, Always There”: Tim Hortons and the Consumer Citizen

    Chapter Three: “Our Game”: Hockey, Civilizing Projects, and Domestic Violence

    Chapter Four: Peace, Order and Good Gambling

    Chapter Five: The Funny State Apparatus

    Conclusion: Minding the Gap

    Notes

    Bibliography

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