Digital Mosaic: Media, Power, and Identity in Canada

By David Taras

© 2015

Digital Media has transformed the way Canadians socialize and interact, conduct business, experience culture, fight political battles, and acquire knowledge. Traditional media, including newspapers and conventional TV networks, remain the primary link to Canada's political sphere but are under concerted attack. YouTube, blogs, online broadcasting, Facebook, and Twitter have opened new and exciting avenues of expression but offer little of the same "nation-building glue" as traditional media. Consequently, Canada is experiencing a number of overlapping crises simultaneously: a crisis in news and journalism, threats to the survival of the media system as a whole, and a decline in citizen engagement.

In Digital Mosaic, David Taras both embraces and challenges new media by arguing that these coinciding crises bring exciting opportunities as well as considerable dangers to democratic life and citizen engagement in Canada.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# HE000578

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2015

    From: $30.36

    Regular Price: $37.95

    ISBN 9781442608863
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2015

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    Regular Price: $30.95

Quick Overview

In Digital Mosaic, David Taras both embraces and challenges new media by arguing that coinciding crises bring exciting opportunities as well as considerable dangers to democratic life and citizen engagement in Canada.

Digital Mosaic: Media, Power, and Identity in Canada

By David Taras

© 2015

Digital Media has transformed the way Canadians socialize and interact, conduct business, experience culture, fight political battles, and acquire knowledge. Traditional media, including newspapers and conventional TV networks, remain the primary link to Canada's political sphere but are under concerted attack. YouTube, blogs, online broadcasting, Facebook, and Twitter have opened new and exciting avenues of expression but offer little of the same "nation-building glue" as traditional media. Consequently, Canada is experiencing a number of overlapping crises simultaneously: a crisis in news and journalism, threats to the survival of the media system as a whole, and a decline in citizen engagement.

In Digital Mosaic, David Taras both embraces and challenges new media by arguing that these coinciding crises bring exciting opportunities as well as considerable dangers to democratic life and citizen engagement in Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    In Digital Mosaic, David Taras achieves what no one else has even tried: he makes coherent sense of the massive and ongoing upheavals in journalism and Canada's media industries, the rise of social media, and how all these changes have fractured longstanding links to citizenship, culture, privacy, national identity, public policy, and democracy. Taras masterfully explains how it has all happened, raises concerns about the directions these changes are leading us in, and calls on Canadians and their governments to be active and creative in their responses. It's cliché to say it should be required reading for all, but it should be.
    Christopher Waddell, Carleton University

    Rich in detail and written in an engaging style, Digital Mosaic is a timely and thoroughly researched look at what changes in the local, national, and global mediascape mean for Canadians.
    Patrick McCurdy, University of Ottawa

    David Taras provides his readers with a deeply researched account of how changes, evolutions, and revolutions in communication practices impact our daily lives and citizenship, for better or for worse. Drawing on the Canadian experience, and often comparing it with other national contexts, Digital Mosaic is a thought-provoking essay that anyone interested in political communication should read.
    Thierry Giasson, Universite Laval
  • Author Information

    David Taras is a professor and Ralph Klein Chair in Media Studies at Mount Royal University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements

    1. The New Architecture of Media Power
    Understanding Media Shock
    Media Change and Canadian Public Spaces
    Looking Ahead

    2. Identity and Citizenship in Canada.ca
    The Unlikely Country
    The Public Participation Scorecard
    Turbulent Times: the Effects of Economic and Media Change

    3. The Ownership Juggernaut
    The Powers That Be
    The Power of the Powerful
    Corporate Rules: Values, Ideology, and the News
    Democracy Insurance

    4. Me-media and Political Connectedness (or Not): Cable, Blogs, and YouTube
    The New Debate about Media Effects
    The Cable Explosion
    The Blog Hierarchy
    YouTube and Video Politics
    The Politics of Me-media

    5. Connecting and Disconnecting on the Social Media Frontier
    Is Facebook Your Friend?
    "Put Down Twitter and Slowly Back Away?"
    Welcome to the New World

    6. Falling Stars: The Future of Newspapers and Conventional Broadcasting
    "Every Newspaper Reader That Dies Leaves No Heir"
    The Great Canadian Television Crisis
    Music and Radio: Hits and Misses
    Are the Traditional Media Doomed to Extinction?

    7. The Ever-shrinking World of Public Broadcasting
    Triple Jeopardy: Budget Cuts, Hockey Night in Canada, and Big TV
    Re-imagining the CBC

    8. Are Journalists and Politicians Abandoning the Public?
    Blind Spots, Cutbacks, and the Decline of Political Reporting
    Totally Scripted: Avoid, Bypass, and Stick to Your Message
    Nowhere to Hide: The Value and Politics of Debates
    The Last Disconnect

    9. Finding Citizenship in the Digital Mosaic
    It's Time to Do Better

    Bibliography
    Index

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