Diplomacy of Fear: Canada and the Cold War 1941–1948

By Denis Smith

© 1988

The wartime alliance of the Soviet Union with Britain, the United States, Canada, and their allies very quickly unravelled after the war; in its place rose up the East-West enmity that remains today. Denis Smith here tells the story of how mutual conflict and misunderstanding led to the disintegration of the alliance with the Soviet Union, and of how Canada chose its place as a secondary member of the emerging American alliance.

Smith draws on Canadian, British, and American historical archives of the years from the German invasion of Russia to the establishment of NATO. He emphasizes the unusual efforts that were made to bring the United States into a permanent international role, the West’s tendency to see Russian post-war actions according to the model of Nazi Germany, and the extent to which fear and panic governed Western policy as it forze into the patterns of the cold War in 1947 and 1948. A clear picture emerges of the relationship between the work of officials in Canada’s Department of External Affairs and the policies adopted by the Canadian government.

Smith’s clam reassessment of post-war history sheds considerable light on the roots of East-West relations in the later 1980s, and should assist current efforts to see these relations with renewed realism and good sense.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.6in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP005902

  • PUBLISHED APR 1988

    From: $30.71

    Regular Price: $40.95

    ISBN 9780802066848
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1988

    From: $30.71

    Regular Price: $40.95

Quick Overview

Smith’s clam reassessment of post-war history sheds considerable light on the roots of East-West relations in the later 1980s, and should assist current efforts to see these relations with renewed realism and good sense

Diplomacy of Fear: Canada and the Cold War 1941–1948

By Denis Smith

© 1988

The wartime alliance of the Soviet Union with Britain, the United States, Canada, and their allies very quickly unravelled after the war; in its place rose up the East-West enmity that remains today. Denis Smith here tells the story of how mutual conflict and misunderstanding led to the disintegration of the alliance with the Soviet Union, and of how Canada chose its place as a secondary member of the emerging American alliance.

Smith draws on Canadian, British, and American historical archives of the years from the German invasion of Russia to the establishment of NATO. He emphasizes the unusual efforts that were made to bring the United States into a permanent international role, the West’s tendency to see Russian post-war actions according to the model of Nazi Germany, and the extent to which fear and panic governed Western policy as it forze into the patterns of the cold War in 1947 and 1948. A clear picture emerges of the relationship between the work of officials in Canada’s Department of External Affairs and the policies adopted by the Canadian government.

Smith’s clam reassessment of post-war history sheds considerable light on the roots of East-West relations in the later 1980s, and should assist current efforts to see these relations with renewed realism and good sense.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.6in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Denis Smith is Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political cience, University of Western Ontario.