E-Crit: Digital Media, Critical Theory, and the Humanities

By Marcel O'Gorman

© 2006

In E-Crit, Marcel O'Gorman takes an ambitious and provocative look at how university scholarship, pedagogy, and curricula might be transformed to suit a digital culture. Arguing that universities were founded on the logic of print culture, O'Gorman sets out to reinvent the academic apparatus, constructing a hybrid methodology that draws on avant-garde art, deconstructive theory, cognitive science, and the work of painter and poet William Blake.

O'Gorman explores the ways in which digital media might help to restore the critical, intellectual purpose of higher education, which has been repressed by the technocratic structures that dominate the modern university. He argues that the revolutionary, socio-critical impetus that spurred deconstructive theory and transformed the humanities was lost in the initial attempts to digitize the literary canon and demonstrate the convergence of critical theory and hypertext. Humanities disciplines, he argues, must reposition themselves through the invention of humanities-based interdisciplinary programs capable of adapting to the post-print vicissitudes of a digital culture. E-Crit is thus essential reading for anyone concerned with the practice - and future - of the humanities in higher education.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 158 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.8in x 0.5in x 9.7in
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SKU# SP002235

  • PUBLISHED JUN 2007

    From: $17.96

    Regular Price: $23.95

    ISBN 9780802095442
  • PUBLISHED DEC 2006

    From: $17.96

    Regular Price: $23.95

Quick Overview

. E-Crit is thus essential reading for anyone concerned with the practice - and future - of the humanities in higher education.

E-Crit: Digital Media, Critical Theory, and the Humanities

By Marcel O'Gorman

© 2006

In E-Crit, Marcel O'Gorman takes an ambitious and provocative look at how university scholarship, pedagogy, and curricula might be transformed to suit a digital culture. Arguing that universities were founded on the logic of print culture, O'Gorman sets out to reinvent the academic apparatus, constructing a hybrid methodology that draws on avant-garde art, deconstructive theory, cognitive science, and the work of painter and poet William Blake.

O'Gorman explores the ways in which digital media might help to restore the critical, intellectual purpose of higher education, which has been repressed by the technocratic structures that dominate the modern university. He argues that the revolutionary, socio-critical impetus that spurred deconstructive theory and transformed the humanities was lost in the initial attempts to digitize the literary canon and demonstrate the convergence of critical theory and hypertext. Humanities disciplines, he argues, must reposition themselves through the invention of humanities-based interdisciplinary programs capable of adapting to the post-print vicissitudes of a digital culture. E-Crit is thus essential reading for anyone concerned with the practice - and future - of the humanities in higher education.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 158 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.8in x 0.5in x 9.7in
  • Reviews

    ‘From its adventuresome spirit, and it’s deliberately provisional methodology, to its desire to reform academic discourses and practices, there is much to like about Marcel O’Gorman’s E-Crit. The author argues that critical methodologies, disciplinary structures, and entire universities need to be revised in order to accommodate a more open, less hierarchical, more visually intensive and culturally relevant education. This book makes an important contribution by advancing our thinking about how digital media can and should be incorporated in to academia.’


    Katherine Hayles
    Department of English, UCLA
  • Author Information

    Marcel O'Gorman is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Waterloo.

  • Table of contents

    LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    INTRODUCTION

    1. The Canon, the Archive, and the Remainder: Reimagining Scholarly Discourse
    2. The Search for Exemplars: Discourse Networks and the Pictorial Turn
    3. The Hypericonic De-Vise: Peter Ramus Meets William Blake
    4. Nonsense and Play: The Figure/Ground Shift in New Media Discourse
    5. From Écriture to E-Crit: On Postmodern Curriculum

    NOTES

    WORKS CITED

    ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

    INDEX

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