Expositions of the Psalms: Collected Works of Erasmus, Vol. 63

By Erasmus, Dominic Baker-Smith, and Michael Heath

© 1998

Between 1515 and 1533 Erasmus wrote commentaries on eleven psalms. His principal aim was, as in his Paraphrases, to contribute, through the exposition of the Bible, to the renewal of preaching and devotional literature. This is the first of three volumes of the Expositions of the Psalms in the Collected Works of Erasmus. It contains the commentaries ‘Blessed the Man’ / ‘Beatus vir,’ ‘Why Did the Nations Rage?’ / ‘Quare fremuerunt gentes?,’ ‘O Lord, How Have My Tormentors Multiplied?’ / ‘Domine quid multiplicati?,’ and ‘A Sermon on the Fourth Psalm’ / ‘In psalmum quartum concio.’

The commentaries in this volume recall many of Erasmus’ favourite preoccupations and themes: his concern with Christian ethics; his constant exhortation to readers to practise the philosophia Christi and place their trust in God; the importance of exercising, in deeds rather than merely in words, charity towards those less fortunate than oneself, and the need to avoid vanity and falsehood at every turn. Erasmus stresses the role of the psalms as a comfort in tribulation and an exhortation to piety – in the very specific meaning that he gives to that word. He remains ever concerned about how the psalms relate to each individual in the conduct of his or her life.

The introduction by Dominic Baker-Smith provides an important framework for the understanding and appreciation of all three volumes of the Expositions of the Psalms.

Volume 63 of the Collected Works of Erasmus series.

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Product Details

  • Series: Collected Works of Erasmus
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 480 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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Erasmus stresses the role of the psalms as a comfort in tribulation and an exhortation to piety – in the very specific meaning that he gives to that word. He remains ever concerned about how the psalms relate to each individual in the conduct of his or her life.

Expositions of the Psalms: Collected Works of Erasmus, Vol. 63

By Erasmus, Dominic Baker-Smith, and Michael Heath

© 1998

Between 1515 and 1533 Erasmus wrote commentaries on eleven psalms. His principal aim was, as in his Paraphrases, to contribute, through the exposition of the Bible, to the renewal of preaching and devotional literature. This is the first of three volumes of the Expositions of the Psalms in the Collected Works of Erasmus. It contains the commentaries ‘Blessed the Man’ / ‘Beatus vir,’ ‘Why Did the Nations Rage?’ / ‘Quare fremuerunt gentes?,’ ‘O Lord, How Have My Tormentors Multiplied?’ / ‘Domine quid multiplicati?,’ and ‘A Sermon on the Fourth Psalm’ / ‘In psalmum quartum concio.’

The commentaries in this volume recall many of Erasmus’ favourite preoccupations and themes: his concern with Christian ethics; his constant exhortation to readers to practise the philosophia Christi and place their trust in God; the importance of exercising, in deeds rather than merely in words, charity towards those less fortunate than oneself, and the need to avoid vanity and falsehood at every turn. Erasmus stresses the role of the psalms as a comfort in tribulation and an exhortation to piety – in the very specific meaning that he gives to that word. He remains ever concerned about how the psalms relate to each individual in the conduct of his or her life.

The introduction by Dominic Baker-Smith provides an important framework for the understanding and appreciation of all three volumes of the Expositions of the Psalms.

Volume 63 of the Collected Works of Erasmus series.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Collected Works of Erasmus
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 480 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Desiderius Erasmus (c. 1466-1536), a Dutch humanist, Catholic priest, and scholar, was one of the most influential Renaissance figures. A professor of divinity and Greek, Erasmus wrote, taught, and travelled, meeting with Europe’s foremost scholars. A prolific author, Erasmus wrote on both ecclesiastic and general human interest subjects.


    Dominic Baker-Smith is a professor emeritus of English Literature at the University of Amsterdam.



    Michael J. Heath is an emeritus professor in the Department of French at King’s College London.