Falling into Matter: Problems of Embodiment in English Fiction from Defoe to Shelley

By Elizabeth R. Napier

© 2011

Falling into Matter examines the complex role of the body in the development of the English novel in the eighteenth century. Elizabeth R. Napier argues that despite an increasing emphasis on the need to present ideas in corporeal terms, early fiction writers continued to register spiritual and moral reservations about the centrality of the body to human and imaginative experience.

Drawing on six works of early English fiction — Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Samuel Richardson's Clarissa, Henry Fielding's Tom Jones, Elizabeth Inchbald's A Simple Story, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Napier examines how authors grappled with technical and philosophical issues of the body, questioning its capacity for moral action, its relationship to individual freedom and dignity, and its role in the creation of art. Falling into Matter charts the course of the early novel as its authors engaged formally, stylistically, and thematically with the increasingly insistent role of the body in the new genre.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP002978

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2012

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781442641983
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2012

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

Quick Overview

Falling into Matter examines the complex role of the body in the development of the English novel in the eighteenth century.

Falling into Matter: Problems of Embodiment in English Fiction from Defoe to Shelley

By Elizabeth R. Napier

© 2011

Falling into Matter examines the complex role of the body in the development of the English novel in the eighteenth century. Elizabeth R. Napier argues that despite an increasing emphasis on the need to present ideas in corporeal terms, early fiction writers continued to register spiritual and moral reservations about the centrality of the body to human and imaginative experience.

Drawing on six works of early English fiction — Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Samuel Richardson's Clarissa, Henry Fielding's Tom Jones, Elizabeth Inchbald's A Simple Story, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Napier examines how authors grappled with technical and philosophical issues of the body, questioning its capacity for moral action, its relationship to individual freedom and dignity, and its role in the creation of art. Falling into Matter charts the course of the early novel as its authors engaged formally, stylistically, and thematically with the increasingly insistent role of the body in the new genre.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘Napier offers interesting readings of individual texts; specialists in the 18th century novel will surely wish to consult them… Recommended.’
    A.W. Lee
    Choice Magazine; vol 50:03:2012
  • Author Information

    Elizabeth R. Napier is a professor in the Department of English and American Literatures at Middlebury College.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1.  Robinson Crusoe: Discord
    2.  Gulliver’s Travels: Shock
    3.  Clarissa: Grace
    4.  Tom Jones: Cohesion
    5.  A Simple Story: Dissipation
    6.  Frankenstein: Dissociation

    Epilogue

    Bibliography
    Index

Related Titles