Female Enterprise in the New Economy

By Karen D. Hughes

© 2006

The rise of women's self-employment and small business ownership has received a great deal of attention in North America and industrialized countries around the world. In Female Enterprise in the New Economy, Karen D. Hughes examines whether an increasingly entrepreneurial economy offers women better opportunities for economic success, or instead increases their risk of poverty and economic insecurity.

Drawing on original data from interviews, statistical research, and other sources, Hughes explores the reasons why women are starting businesses in record numbers. She looks at the type of work that entrepreneurial women are pursuing, the satisfaction they derive from their work, and the economic risks and rewards they face. Placing this study in the context of broader debates on economic restructuring, the emergence of a 'risk society,' and growing economic polarization, Hughes illustrates the diversity within women's self-employment and small business ownership, and the need for policies to better address the particular needs of this sector of the workforce.

Tackling a range of issues and theoretical assumptions, Female Enterprise in the New Economy will be of interest to a wide audience in sociology, organizational studies, entrepreneurship studies, public policy, political economy, and women's studies.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.7in x 9.0in
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  • PUBLISHED DEC 2005

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Quick Overview

Tackling a range of issues and theoretical assumptions, Female Enterprise in the New Economy will be of interest to a wide audience in sociology, organizational studies, entrepreneurship studies, public policy, political economy, and women's studies.

Female Enterprise in the New Economy

By Karen D. Hughes

© 2006

The rise of women's self-employment and small business ownership has received a great deal of attention in North America and industrialized countries around the world. In Female Enterprise in the New Economy, Karen D. Hughes examines whether an increasingly entrepreneurial economy offers women better opportunities for economic success, or instead increases their risk of poverty and economic insecurity.

Drawing on original data from interviews, statistical research, and other sources, Hughes explores the reasons why women are starting businesses in record numbers. She looks at the type of work that entrepreneurial women are pursuing, the satisfaction they derive from their work, and the economic risks and rewards they face. Placing this study in the context of broader debates on economic restructuring, the emergence of a 'risk society,' and growing economic polarization, Hughes illustrates the diversity within women's self-employment and small business ownership, and the need for policies to better address the particular needs of this sector of the workforce.

Tackling a range of issues and theoretical assumptions, Female Enterprise in the New Economy will be of interest to a wide audience in sociology, organizational studies, entrepreneurship studies, public policy, political economy, and women's studies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.7in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Karen D. Hughes is an associate professor in the Women's Studies Program and an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta.

  • Table of contents

    LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    1. Introduction
      1. Economic Restructuring and the ‘New’ Canadian Economy
      2. Women’s Self-Employment and Small Business Ownership (SE/SBO)
      3. Book Outline
    2. Researching Women in the Entrepreneurial Economy
      1. Data Sources
      2. Study Details
      3. Introducing the Women
      4. Terminology: Self-Employed, Small Business Owners, and Entrepreneurs
    3. Women’s Paths into Self-Employment and Small Business
      1. What Fuels Self-Employment and Small Business Ownership?
      2. Rethinking the Push-Pull Debate
      3. Women’s Education and Work Histories
      4. Women’s Past Experience with Business Ownership
      5. Reasons for Becoming Self-Employed
      6. Understanding Pull Factors
      7. From Pull to Push
      8. Conclusion
    4.  ‘I Love What I Do!’ Job Satisfaction and the Creation of Meaningful Work
      1. ‘I Do Everything’: Daily Work and Rhythms
      2. ‘I Just Come in and Live Here!’: Working Hours
      3. Job Satisfaction: Canadian and International Trends
      4. Job Satisfaction and Job Quality: Sharpening the Picture
      5. Excavating Job Satisfaction: The Study
      6. Exploring Differences in Job Satisfaction
      7. Conclusions
    5. Players or Paupers? Income, Job Security, and the Negotiation of Risk
      1. Economic Polarization, Self-Employment, and Small Business Ownership
      2. The Current Picture: National Trends
      3. Income and Economic Security: The Study
      4. Exploring Differences in Income and Economic Security
      5. Conclusions
    6. Building an Entrepreneurial Economy
      1. Business Start-up, Expansion, and Growth Women’s Attitudes TowardsBusiness Growth: The Study
      2. Training for an Entrepreneurial Economy
      3. ‘Policy Limbo’ and the ‘Do It Yourself Safety Net’
      4. Conclusions
    7. Conclusions

    APPENDIX 1: INTERVIEW SCHEDULE

    APPENDIX 2: SUMMARY SHEET

    APPENDIX 3: INTERVIEW PARTICIPANTS

    NOTES

    REFERENCES

    INDEX

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