For My Country/'Pour la Patrie': An 1895 Religious and Separatist Vision of Quebec set in the Mid-Twentieth Century

By Jules-Paul Tardivel; Translated by Sheila Fischman

© 1975

In his frankly separatist and religious novel Pour la patrie, Jules-Paul Tardivel expressed in an extreme way what the majority of nineteenth-century Quebeckers would have expressed more moderately. Originally published in 1895, the novel reiterates two central themes of Tardivel’s writing: the Catholicism of French Canada and its unique social and political implications, and the Quebec-centred need of French Canada for its own separate state. Tardivel wrote this book to help Quebec become ‘a new France, whose mission it will be to continue on this American soil the work of Christian civilization that the old France pursued for so many hundreds of years.’ Though set in mid-twentieth century, Pour la Patrie represents Tardivel’s vision of his own times. He was a man of his time and of his society, and both as editor of the widely-read newspaper La Vérité and in his many other political writings, his influence on that society was great. If he was more extreme than most of his contemporaries in Quebec, it was more in his politics than his ideology: his underlying notions of religion, society, and the relations of men to each other and to God were in harmony with those of his province, and indeed, as the international circulation of his writing suggests, with the extreme Catholicism – the militantly defensive Catholicism – of his age.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP006308

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1975

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

Quick Overview

Originally published in 1895, the novel reiterates two central themes of Tardivel’s writing: the Catholicism of French Canada and its unique social and political implications, and the Quebec-centred need of French Canada for its own separate state.

For My Country/'Pour la Patrie': An 1895 Religious and Separatist Vision of Quebec set in the Mid-Twentieth Century

By Jules-Paul Tardivel; Translated by Sheila Fischman

© 1975

In his frankly separatist and religious novel Pour la patrie, Jules-Paul Tardivel expressed in an extreme way what the majority of nineteenth-century Quebeckers would have expressed more moderately. Originally published in 1895, the novel reiterates two central themes of Tardivel’s writing: the Catholicism of French Canada and its unique social and political implications, and the Quebec-centred need of French Canada for its own separate state. Tardivel wrote this book to help Quebec become ‘a new France, whose mission it will be to continue on this American soil the work of Christian civilization that the old France pursued for so many hundreds of years.’ Though set in mid-twentieth century, Pour la Patrie represents Tardivel’s vision of his own times. He was a man of his time and of his society, and both as editor of the widely-read newspaper La Vérité and in his many other political writings, his influence on that society was great. If he was more extreme than most of his contemporaries in Quebec, it was more in his politics than his ideology: his underlying notions of religion, society, and the relations of men to each other and to God were in harmony with those of his province, and indeed, as the international circulation of his writing suggests, with the extreme Catholicism – the militantly defensive Catholicism – of his age.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Jules-Paul Tardivel was an American–Québécois writer and a significant promoter of Quebec nationalism.



    Sheila Fischman is a Canadian translator who specializes in the translation of works of contemporary Quebec literature.