From Wall Street to Bay Street: The Origins and Evolution of American and Canadian Finance

By Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin

© 2018

The 2008 financial crisis rippled across the globe and triggered a worldwide recession. Unlike the American banking system which experienced massive losses, takeovers, and taxpayer funded bailouts, Canada’s banking system withstood the crisis relatively well and maintained its liquidity and profitability. The divergence in the two banking systems can be traced to their distinct institutional and political histories.

From Wall Street to Bay Street is the first book for a lay audience to tackle the similarities and differences between the financial systems of Canada and the United States. Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin reveal the different paths each system has taken since the early nineteenth-century, despite the fact that they both originate from the British system. The authors trace the roots of each country’s financial systems back to Alexander Hamilton and insightfully argue that while Canada has preserved a Hamiltonian financial tradition, the United States has favoured the populist Jacksonian tradition since the 1830s. The sporadic and inconsistent fashion in which the American system have changed over time is at odds with the evolutionary path taken by the Canadian system. From Wall Street to Bay Street offers a timely and accessible comparison of financial systems that reflects the political and cultural milieus of two of the world’s top ten economies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • Imprint: Rotman-UTP Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 416 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 15182

Book Formats

SKU# SP003795

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2018

    From: $22.72

    Regular Price: $34.95

    ISBN 9781442616257
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2018

    From: $67.50

    Regular Price: $90.00

    ISBN 9781442648210
  • PUBLISHED APR 2018
    From: $34.95

Quick Overview

From Wall Street to Bay Street is the first book for a lay audience to tackle the similarities and differences between the financial systems of Canada and the United States. Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin reveal the different paths each system has taken since the early nineteenth-century.

From Wall Street to Bay Street: The Origins and Evolution of American and Canadian Finance

By Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin

© 2018

The 2008 financial crisis rippled across the globe and triggered a worldwide recession. Unlike the American banking system which experienced massive losses, takeovers, and taxpayer funded bailouts, Canada’s banking system withstood the crisis relatively well and maintained its liquidity and profitability. The divergence in the two banking systems can be traced to their distinct institutional and political histories.

From Wall Street to Bay Street is the first book for a lay audience to tackle the similarities and differences between the financial systems of Canada and the United States. Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin reveal the different paths each system has taken since the early nineteenth-century, despite the fact that they both originate from the British system. The authors trace the roots of each country’s financial systems back to Alexander Hamilton and insightfully argue that while Canada has preserved a Hamiltonian financial tradition, the United States has favoured the populist Jacksonian tradition since the 1830s. The sporadic and inconsistent fashion in which the American system have changed over time is at odds with the evolutionary path taken by the Canadian system. From Wall Street to Bay Street offers a timely and accessible comparison of financial systems that reflects the political and cultural milieus of two of the world’s top ten economies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • Imprint: Rotman-UTP Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 416 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Financial historians Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin of the Rotman School of Management chronicle 300 years of money in Canada with an account rich in anecdotes and telling in its findings. …From Wall Street To Bay Street moves at a smart clip with quirky research. Who knew colonial Québec used playing cards as currency, or that the Spanish silver dollar was the most commonly circulated coin in Nova Scotia in 1790?"


    Holly Doan
    Blacklock’s Reporter, April 7, 2018

    "A clearly written and cogently argued study, written for both the generalist and the specialist, that yields important insights into the historical development of the financial sectors of Canada and the United States. History might not always repeat itself, but learning from these insights would help the two countries find a better balance between financial innovation and financial stability, thereby maintaining vibrant economies while avoiding another financial crisis that leads to a Great Recession."


    Sir George Bain, Queen’s University Belfast.

    "A landmark of internationally comparative history, informed throughout by the urbane wisdom of its authors, who have shown that financial market history is both larger and smaller than that of nations and, on some dimensions, more subtle and complex."


    Leslie Hannah, London School of Economics.

    "Despite their close proximity and longstanding economic ties, the United States and Canada are rarely studied in tandem. In this sweeping, erudite history of financial history in North America, Christopher Kobrak and Joe Martin put the two nations’ divergent histories in productive dialog with one another. The results are fascinating and timely. When seen in each other’s reflection, the financial histories of both countries look altogether different than when studied in isolation. From Wall Street to Bay Street is an exemplary work of comparative history. It deserves a wide readership on both sides of the border."


    Stephen Mihm, Department of History, University of Georgia.

    "The book serves admirably as a reminder of the importance of the financial system in a nation’s economic development. It also provides historical context for the ongoing effort to successfully manage contemporary and future challenges and opportunities."


    L.R. (Red) Wilson, O.C., Chancellor Emeritus, McMaster University

    "Anyone seeking to know how Canada's financial system remained relatively immune to the meltdown of American finance after 2008 needs to read this book. The authors offer a long-term perspective on the trade-offs between relative stability (Canada) and the often reckless but dynamic financial innovation (America)The authors make clear that the financial architecture of any country is intricately embedded in its historical choices and value systems.


    Jeffrey Fear, School of Social & Political Sciences, University of Glasgow
  • Author Information

    Joseph E. Martin is the Director of the Canadian Business and Financial History Initiative at the Rotman School of Management as well as President Emeritus of Canada’s History Society.


    Christopher Kobrak was the Wilson/Currie Chair of Canadian Business and Financial History at the Rotman School of Management as well as a professor emeritus of finance at ESCP, Paris.
  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Chapter 1: Foreign and Domestic Beginnings: From Colonies to the Civil War

    Chapter 2: Transitional Decade: The Rebirth and Birth of Nations

    Chapter 3: The Maturing: 1869-1914

    Chapter 4: "The Great Disorder" and Growing Social Demands: 1914-1945

    Chapter 5: The Short Pax Americana: 1945-2000

    Chapter 6: Conclusions: Continuities and Discontinuities in North American Finance leading to 2008