Gifts and Graces: Prayer, Poetry, and Polemic from Lancelot Andrewes to John Bunyan

By David Gay

© 2021

Prayer divided seventeenth-century England. Anglican Conformists such as Lancelot Andrewes and Jeremy Taylor upheld set forms of prayer in the Book of Common Prayer, a book designed to unite the nation in worship. Puritan Reformers and Dissenters such as John Milton and John Bunyan rejected the prayer book and advocated for extemporaneous or free prayer. In 1645, the mainly Puritan Long Parliament proscribed the Book of Common Prayer and dismantled the Anglican Church in the midst of civil war. This led Anglican poets and liturgists to defend their tradition with energy and erudition in print. In 1662, with monarchy restored, the mainly Anglican Cavalier Parliament reinstated the Church and its prayer book to impose religious uniformity. This galvanized English Nonconformity and Dissent and gave rise to a vibrant literary counter-tradition.

Addressing this fascinating history, David Gay examines competing claims to spiritual gifts and graces in polemical texts and their influence on prayer and poetry. Amid the contention of differing voices, the disputed connection of poetry and prayer, imagination and religion, emerges as a central tension in early modern literature and culture.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005508

  • AVAILABLE FEB 2021

    From: $52.50

    Regular Price: $70.00

    ISBN 9781487505288
  • AVAILABLE MAR 2021

    From: $52.50

    Regular Price: $70.00

Quick Overview

This book explores early modern debates over prayer and liturgy from Anglican and Puritan perspectives, highlighting the poetic representation of prayer on both sides of the controversy.

Gifts and Graces: Prayer, Poetry, and Polemic from Lancelot Andrewes to John Bunyan

By David Gay

© 2021

Prayer divided seventeenth-century England. Anglican Conformists such as Lancelot Andrewes and Jeremy Taylor upheld set forms of prayer in the Book of Common Prayer, a book designed to unite the nation in worship. Puritan Reformers and Dissenters such as John Milton and John Bunyan rejected the prayer book and advocated for extemporaneous or free prayer. In 1645, the mainly Puritan Long Parliament proscribed the Book of Common Prayer and dismantled the Anglican Church in the midst of civil war. This led Anglican poets and liturgists to defend their tradition with energy and erudition in print. In 1662, with monarchy restored, the mainly Anglican Cavalier Parliament reinstated the Church and its prayer book to impose religious uniformity. This galvanized English Nonconformity and Dissent and gave rise to a vibrant literary counter-tradition.

Addressing this fascinating history, David Gay examines competing claims to spiritual gifts and graces in polemical texts and their influence on prayer and poetry. Amid the contention of differing voices, the disputed connection of poetry and prayer, imagination and religion, emerges as a central tension in early modern literature and culture.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    David Gay is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Alberta.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1. Lancelot Andrewes and George Herbert: Where Most Pray

    2. Jeremy Taylor: The Blessing of Unity

    3. John Milton: The True Model

    4. John Bunyan: The Nameless Instrument

    Afterword

    Bibliography

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