Goodbye Eros: Recasting Forms and Norms of Love in the Age of Cervantes

Edited by Ana Maria Laguna and John Beusterien

© 2020

Traditional Petrarchan and Neoplatonic paradigms of love started to show clear signs of inadequacy and exhaustion in the sixteenth century. How did the Spanish Golden Age recast worn out discourses of love and make them compelling again? This volume explores how Spanish letters recognized that old love paradigms, especially the crisis of the subject, presented an extraordinary opportunity for revising traditional literary strictures. As a result, during Spain’s nascent modernity, literature took up the challenge to expand existing forms of desire and subjectivity.

A range of scholars show how canonical and non-canonical Golden Age writers like Miguel de Cervantes, Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, Francisco de Quevedo, Luis de Góngora, Lope de Vega, and Francisco de la Torre y Sevil became equal agents of the sweeping ontological reconfiguration of the idea of eros that defined their culture. Such reconfiguration includes: the troubling displacement of "self" and "other" seen in sentimental genres like the pastoral or romance; the overlapping of emotions such as love and jealousy characteristic of the baroque lyric and dramatic production; and the conflation of axioms such as eros and eris prevalent in contemporaneous epic experiments.

In uniting the findings of often surprising texts, the collection of essays in Goodbye Eros takes a pioneering look at how Golden Age moral, ideological, scientific, and literary discourses intersected to create fascinating re-elaborations of the trope of love.

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Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Iberic
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 350 pages
  • Illustrations: 17
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.8in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP005356

  • PUBLISHED APR 2020

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781487504212
  • PUBLISHED APR 2020

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

Quick Overview

A surfeit of tropes about love exhausted Spanish literature in the age of Cervantes. This book provides a pioneering look at the rich array of ways in which Spanish Golden Age authors responded by crafting a new literary aesthetic.

Goodbye Eros: Recasting Forms and Norms of Love in the Age of Cervantes

Edited by Ana Maria Laguna and John Beusterien

© 2020

Traditional Petrarchan and Neoplatonic paradigms of love started to show clear signs of inadequacy and exhaustion in the sixteenth century. How did the Spanish Golden Age recast worn out discourses of love and make them compelling again? This volume explores how Spanish letters recognized that old love paradigms, especially the crisis of the subject, presented an extraordinary opportunity for revising traditional literary strictures. As a result, during Spain’s nascent modernity, literature took up the challenge to expand existing forms of desire and subjectivity.

A range of scholars show how canonical and non-canonical Golden Age writers like Miguel de Cervantes, Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, Francisco de Quevedo, Luis de Góngora, Lope de Vega, and Francisco de la Torre y Sevil became equal agents of the sweeping ontological reconfiguration of the idea of eros that defined their culture. Such reconfiguration includes: the troubling displacement of "self" and "other" seen in sentimental genres like the pastoral or romance; the overlapping of emotions such as love and jealousy characteristic of the baroque lyric and dramatic production; and the conflation of axioms such as eros and eris prevalent in contemporaneous epic experiments.

In uniting the findings of often surprising texts, the collection of essays in Goodbye Eros takes a pioneering look at how Golden Age moral, ideological, scientific, and literary discourses intersected to create fascinating re-elaborations of the trope of love.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Iberic
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 350 pages
  • Illustrations: 17
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.8in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    "Goodbye Eros offers a welcome critical focus, as eros as understood in this period is studied less often in recent years than it should be, given its central role in the period’s literature."


    Robert Bayliss, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Kansas

    "Goodbye Eros is a fundamental contribution to the field. The central objectives, centered on love, visual representation, as well as race and gender issues, are well developed and achieved. This book will be of interest to all scholars of early modern Spain, especially those teaching courses on Cervantes and love, or more generally, sexuality and desire."


    Luis Avilés, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of California, Irvine
  • Author Information

    Ana Maria Laguna is an associate professor of Spanish at Rutgers University-Camden.


    John Beusterien is a professor of Spanish at Texas Tech University.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction: Eros in the Age of Cervantes
    Ana Maria Laguna, Rutgers University and John Beusterien, Texas Tech University

    Part I. Amorous Optics: Reframing Perception, Gender Subjectivity, and Genre Convention

    1. Egocentricity versus Persuasion: Eros, Logos, and Pathos in Cervantes’s Marcela and Grisóstomo Episode
    Joan Cammarata, Manhattan College and Ana Maria Laguna, Rutgers University

    2. The Deceived Gaze: Visual Fantasy, Art, and Feminine Adultery in Cervantes’s Reading of Ariosto
    Mercedes Alcalá Galán, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Part II. Reasoning the Unreasonable: Towards a Rationale of Love

    3. El Greco and Cervantes’s Euclidean Theologies
    Eric Clifford Graf, Francisco Marroquin University

    4. Love and the Laws of Literature: The Ethics and Poetics of Affect in Cervantes’s "The Little Gypsy Girl"
    Eli Cohen, Swarthmore College

    5. Eros and Ethos in the Political and Religious Logos of The Trials of Persiles and Sigismunda: The Anomic Character in Cervantes
    Jesús Maestro, University of Oviedo

    Part III: Kissing between the Lines: Blurring Sexual and Racial Norms

    6. Sexy Beasts: Women and their Lapdogs in Baroque Satirical Verse
    Adrienne Martin, University of California, Santa Cruz

    7. Sexual Deviance and Morisco Marginality in Cervantes’s The Trials of Persiles and Sigismunda
    Christina Lee, Princeton University

    8. The Black Madonna Icon: Race, Rape, and the Virgin of Montserrat in The Confession with the Devil by Francisco de Torre y Sevil
    John Beusterien, Texas Tech University

    Part IV: Recasting Erotic and Heroic Molds

    9. For Love of the White Sea: The Curious Identity of Uludj Ali
    Diana de Armas Wilson, University of Denver

    10. Writing a Tragic Image: Eros and Eris in Lope de Vega’s Jerusalem Conquered
    Jason McCloskey, Bucknell University

    11. The Un-Romantic Approach to Don Quixote: Cervantine Love in the Spanish, Post-War Age
    Ana Maria Laguna, Rutgers University

    Notes
    List of Contributors

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