Greek and Roman Mechanical Water-Lifting Devices: The History of a Technology

By Joesph Peter Oleson

© 1984

Water is fundamental to human life, and the ways in which a society uses it can tell us a great deal about a people. The ancient Greeks and Romans had at their disposal several mechanical water-lifting devices. The water-screw, the force pump, the compartmented wheel, and the bucket-chain were developed by scientists associated with the great school at Alexandria. Application of these devices was sporadic in the Hellenistic world, but they, and the later saqiya gear, were used in a wide range of rural and urban settings in many parts of the Roman Empire.
Professor Oleson has prepared a definitive study of mechanical water-lifting devices in the Greek and Roman world. He systematically and thoroughly examines the literary, papyrological, and archaeological evidence for the devices and considers the design, materials, settings, costs, effectiveness, and durability of the many adaptations of the small basic repertoire of models. The literary and papyrological materials range from Deuteronomy to papyri of the seventh century AD, and the archaeological sites discussed range from Babylon to Wales.
An extensive collection of illustrations complements the literary, papyrological, and archaeological evidence for this remarkable ancient technology.
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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 624 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005838

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1984

    From: $48.00

    Regular Price: $64.00

    ISBN 9781487578855
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1984

    From: $48.00

    Regular Price: $64.00

Quick Overview

Professor Oleson has prepared a definitive study of mechanical water-lifting devices in the Greek and Roman world. He systematically and thoroughly examines the literary, papyrological, and archaeological evidence for the devices and considers the many adaptations of the small basic repertoire of models.

Greek and Roman Mechanical Water-Lifting Devices: The History of a Technology

By Joesph Peter Oleson

© 1984

Water is fundamental to human life, and the ways in which a society uses it can tell us a great deal about a people. The ancient Greeks and Romans had at their disposal several mechanical water-lifting devices. The water-screw, the force pump, the compartmented wheel, and the bucket-chain were developed by scientists associated with the great school at Alexandria. Application of these devices was sporadic in the Hellenistic world, but they, and the later saqiya gear, were used in a wide range of rural and urban settings in many parts of the Roman Empire.
Professor Oleson has prepared a definitive study of mechanical water-lifting devices in the Greek and Roman world. He systematically and thoroughly examines the literary, papyrological, and archaeological evidence for the devices and considers the design, materials, settings, costs, effectiveness, and durability of the many adaptations of the small basic repertoire of models. The literary and papyrological materials range from Deuteronomy to papyri of the seventh century AD, and the archaeological sites discussed range from Babylon to Wales.
An extensive collection of illustrations complements the literary, papyrological, and archaeological evidence for this remarkable ancient technology.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 624 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    JOHN PETER OLESON is a member of the Department of Classics at the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia.