History of the Book in Canada: Volume 2: 1840-1918

By Fiona Black, Patricia Lockhart Fleming, and Yvan Lamonde

© 2005

Vast in its scope and depth of scholarship, this second volume of the History of the Book in Canada extends the landmark research on Canadian book and print culture from 1840 to the end of the First World War. During this time, the lives of Canadians were shaped by technological innovation, political change, and settlement of the West by immigrants from Europe and migrants from eastern and central Canada and the United States. The development of steam power, telegraphy, photography, electricity, and the railroads transformed the book trades.

Whether it was an urban daily, a small-town weekly, a newspaper published in one of a dozen languages, or a magazine, the periodical press reached readers across the country. The period also saw Canadian authors such as L.M. Montgomery write bestsellers that are still popular today, and marked the introduction of new voices, including those of Black communities, Native peoples, and the Métis led by Louis Riel, into print.

Traditional genres of print - government publications, religious books, almanacs, and schoolbooks - were joined in the mid to late nineteenth century by new forms, such as department store catalogues. Advances in Canada's postal service carried print to a wider audience. Unchallenged by other media until the 1890s, print retained a central role in Canadian society into the new century and remained a key source of information and propaganda during the war years.

This second of three volumes in theHistory of the Book in Canada demonstrates the same research and editorial standards established with Volume One by book history specialists from across the nation. The fascinating story of print in the lives of Canadians continues in this significant contribution to Canada's cultural heritage.

Les Presses de l'Université de Montréal is simultaneously publishing French-language editions of each volume as Histoire du livre et de l'imprimé au Canada. Cet ouvrage est également disponible en langue française aux Presses de l'Université de Montréal.
ISBN: 2-7606-19737

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 670 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.3in x 2.3in x 10.0in
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SKU# SP001829

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2005

    From: $87.75

    Regular Price: $117.00

    ISBN 9780802080127

Quick Overview

This second of three volumes in theHistory of the Book in Canada demonstrates the same research and editorial standards established with Volume One by book history specialists from across the nation.

History of the Book in Canada: Volume 2: 1840-1918

By Fiona Black, Patricia Lockhart Fleming, and Yvan Lamonde

© 2005

Vast in its scope and depth of scholarship, this second volume of the History of the Book in Canada extends the landmark research on Canadian book and print culture from 1840 to the end of the First World War. During this time, the lives of Canadians were shaped by technological innovation, political change, and settlement of the West by immigrants from Europe and migrants from eastern and central Canada and the United States. The development of steam power, telegraphy, photography, electricity, and the railroads transformed the book trades.

Whether it was an urban daily, a small-town weekly, a newspaper published in one of a dozen languages, or a magazine, the periodical press reached readers across the country. The period also saw Canadian authors such as L.M. Montgomery write bestsellers that are still popular today, and marked the introduction of new voices, including those of Black communities, Native peoples, and the Métis led by Louis Riel, into print.

Traditional genres of print - government publications, religious books, almanacs, and schoolbooks - were joined in the mid to late nineteenth century by new forms, such as department store catalogues. Advances in Canada's postal service carried print to a wider audience. Unchallenged by other media until the 1890s, print retained a central role in Canadian society into the new century and remained a key source of information and propaganda during the war years.

This second of three volumes in theHistory of the Book in Canada demonstrates the same research and editorial standards established with Volume One by book history specialists from across the nation. The fascinating story of print in the lives of Canadians continues in this significant contribution to Canada's cultural heritage.

Les Presses de l'Université de Montréal is simultaneously publishing French-language editions of each volume as Histoire du livre et de l'imprimé au Canada. Cet ouvrage est également disponible en langue française aux Presses de l'Université de Montréal.
ISBN: 2-7606-19737

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 670 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.3in x 2.3in x 10.0in
  • Reviews

    ‘The scholarship throughout is scrupulous … This pioneering work immediately becomes an essential reference and sets an admirable standard for the volumes to come.’


    Roy MacSkimming, Globe and Mail

    ‘This is a reference book that every library and anyone interested in Canadian history will want to have.’


    Pat Donnelly, Montreal Gazette

    ‘This composite narrative of print culture in Canada is imaginative, well researched, and scrupulously chronicled. It can be read by both scholars and the educated public alike.’


    Carl Spadoni, Fine Books and Collections

    ‘The publication of this series is a remarkable scholarly event, putting Canadian scholarship at the forefront of a growing international field of study. It is essential reading for the literary and cultural historian of Canada and for book historians everywhere.’


    Bill Bell, General Editor, A History of the Book in Scotland

    ‘One of those foundational texts that, a decade from now, you will imagine was always there.’


    Christopher Wiebe, Vue Weekly

    ‘Ranging from rock painting to the modern newspaper, this broad history of textual communication in Canada is a great scholarly achievement. It gives the reader a genuine insight into the historical complexities of Canada’s polycultural society. The rich and tantalizing glimpses it provides of readers at all levels of society are especially welcome.’


    Martyn Lyons, Executive Editor, History of the Book in Australia

    ‘This is a reference book par excellence.’


    Margaret Goldik, Montreal Review of Books

    ‘Likely to be a foundational text in Canadian literary study … It is an essential text for any Canadian college or university library, and for anyone interested in how Canadians and Canada came to be narrated and documented into being.’


    Cynthia Sugars, Books in Canada
  • Author Information

    Fiona A. Black is the director of the School of Library and Information Studies at Dalhousie University.


    Patricia Lockhart Fleming is a professor emeritus in the Faculty of Information Studies and the Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture at the University of Toronto.



    Yvan Lamonde is a professor in the Department of French Language and Literature at McGill University.

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