Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static and Genetic Phenomenology

By Janet Donohoe

© 2016

In Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity, Janet Donohoe offers a compelling look into Husserl’s shift from a "static" to a "genetic" approach in his analysis of consciousness. Rather than view consciousness as an abstract unity, Husserl began investigating consciousness by taking into account the individual’s lived experiences.

Engaging critics from contemporary analytic schools to third-generation phenomenologists, Donohoe shows that they often do not do justice to the breadth of Husserl’s thoughts. In separate chapters Donohoe elucidates the relevance of Husserl’s later genetic phenomenology to his work on time consciousness, intersubjectivity, and ethical issues. This much-needed synthesis of Husserl’s methodologies will be of interest to Husserl scholars, phenomenologists, and philosophers from both Continental and analytic schools.

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Product Details

  • Series: New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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  • PUBLISHED APR 2016

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    Regular Price: $32.95

    ISBN 9781487520434
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Quick Overview

In Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity, Janet Donohoe offers a compelling look into Husserl’s shift from a "static" to a "genetic" approach in his analysis of consciousness.

Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static and Genetic Phenomenology

By Janet Donohoe

© 2016

In Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity, Janet Donohoe offers a compelling look into Husserl’s shift from a "static" to a "genetic" approach in his analysis of consciousness. Rather than view consciousness as an abstract unity, Husserl began investigating consciousness by taking into account the individual’s lived experiences.

Engaging critics from contemporary analytic schools to third-generation phenomenologists, Donohoe shows that they often do not do justice to the breadth of Husserl’s thoughts. In separate chapters Donohoe elucidates the relevance of Husserl’s later genetic phenomenology to his work on time consciousness, intersubjectivity, and ethical issues. This much-needed synthesis of Husserl’s methodologies will be of interest to Husserl scholars, phenomenologists, and philosophers from both Continental and analytic schools.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "The outstanding strength of Donohoe’s book consists precisely in its clear and comprehensive account of how Husserl’s unpublished genetic phenomenology allowed him to develop substantive views concerning the nature of intersubjectivity, ethics, and history. It is a valuable and much welcomed contribution to studies in contemporary phenomenology and Husserl scholarship."


    Christopher McTavish
    Philosophy in Review

    "This book addresses a complex and original issue in Husserl’s thinking, and examines it in a clear, concise, and stimulating manner … It pushes Husserl scholarship forward and makes a powerful argument for placing a theory of ethics at the heart of Husserl’s thoughts."


    Jonathan Hunt
    British Journal of Phenomenology

    "A very different Husserl emerges from this study of the ‘genetic’ phase of his phenomenology. It not only complements the ‘static’ approach guided so far only by the rules of intentionality. It also significantly corrects the perceived one-sidedness in the way Husserl viewed the problems of ego, intersubjectivity, and ethical and historical dimensions. This book opens the once-closed minds of Husserl scholars to the possibility that Husserl can actually accommodate both the temporally and the culturally Other."


    Kah Kyung Cho, PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo Distinguished Professor
  • Author Information

    Janet Donohoe is a professor of philosophy in the Department of English and Philosophy at the University of West Georgia.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements

    Introduction

    1: On the Distinction Between Static and Genetic Phenomenologies

    2: On Time Consciousness and Its Relationship to Intersubjectivity

    3: On the Question of Intersubjectivity

    4: The Husserlian Account of Ethics

    Conclusion: The Impact of Genetic Phenomeneology

    Select Bibliography

    Index

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