In Defence of Canada Vol IV: Growing Up Allied

By James Earys

© 1985

The emerging threat of a militarily powerful Soviet Union after the Second World War caused the United States to rearm and look to the defence of its northern approaches against a possible Soviet bomber attack. The Canadian government, although less apprehensive about this military threat than the American, realized the necessity of accommodating its neighbour's urgent desire for security and ought to avoid a US-Canada bilateral pact by a multilateral defence treaty and organization linking the democracies of Western Europe and North America.

The fourth volume of James Earys' highly acclaimed history of Canadian defence and external affairs studies the government's role in forming the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; its attempts, partly successful, to give the alliance the functions and authority it considered suited to Canadian interests and those of the Western democracies; and the problems it tried to deal with as a member of the Alliance - problems mobilizing the deterrent, of sharing the burden, and of explanding membership to include Greece, Turkey, and Western Germany. These decisions, made some thirty years ago, have shaped the course of Canadian foreign policy ever since, and continue to have ramifications for Canadian life today.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 432 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP001503

  • PUBLISHED MAY 1985

    From: $37.50

    Regular Price: $50.00

    ISBN 9780802066084
  • AVAILABLE FEB 2020

    From: $36.71

    Regular Price: $48.95

Quick Overview

The fourth volume of James Earys' highly acclaimed history of Canadian defence and external affairs studies the government's role in forming the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

In Defence of Canada Vol IV: Growing Up Allied

By James Earys

© 1985

The emerging threat of a militarily powerful Soviet Union after the Second World War caused the United States to rearm and look to the defence of its northern approaches against a possible Soviet bomber attack. The Canadian government, although less apprehensive about this military threat than the American, realized the necessity of accommodating its neighbour's urgent desire for security and ought to avoid a US-Canada bilateral pact by a multilateral defence treaty and organization linking the democracies of Western Europe and North America.

The fourth volume of James Earys' highly acclaimed history of Canadian defence and external affairs studies the government's role in forming the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; its attempts, partly successful, to give the alliance the functions and authority it considered suited to Canadian interests and those of the Western democracies; and the problems it tried to deal with as a member of the Alliance - problems mobilizing the deterrent, of sharing the burden, and of explanding membership to include Greece, Turkey, and Western Germany. These decisions, made some thirty years ago, have shaped the course of Canadian foreign policy ever since, and continue to have ramifications for Canadian life today.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 432 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "This is an absorbingly written, balanced, humane, clearly-argued study which any contemporary historian would give his right arm to have writ-ten. And its theme and implications involve a great deal more than matters of purely Canadian interest ... Here is to' be found a case-study in minia-ture of the debates over air-power vs. sea-power, of the case for a central Ministry of Defence, and of the effects ofunrestricted budgetary domi-nance of defence expenditure which must have familiar echoes to all students of national defence poJicies ... here documented with a detail. which other case studies can hardly match. From every point of view, this is an outstanding book."
    D.C. Watt
    Journal of Commonwealth Political Studies

    "There could not be any more important reading for anyone trying to apprehend the tenacious traditions underlying our present position in world affairs."
    Kenneth McNaught
    Saturday Night

    "James Eayrs has done it again! The third volume of his innovating history of Canadian external policy and defence, covering the period from the final years of the Second World War to the beginnings of the Cold War, not only maintains but surpasses the high standard set by its predecessors ... Among political scientists, Eayrs is pre-eminently the best stylist."
    F.H. Soward
    Vancouver Sun
  • Author Information

    James Eayrs is a former professor in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto and a professor emeritus at Dalhousie University. He received the Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction in 1965 for the first two volumes of In Defence of Canada. Among his other books are The Art of the Possible and Diplomacy and Its Discontents.

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