Inside Out: The Social Meaning of Mental Retardation

By Robert Bogdan and Steven J. Taylor

© 1982

‘We have to assume that the mind is working no matter what it looks like on the outside. We can’t just judge by appearance…If you take away the label they are human beings.’ Ed Murphy

What does it mean to be ‘mentally retarded’? Professors Bogdan and Taylor have interviewed two experts, ‘Ed Murphy’ and ‘Pattie Burt,’ for answers. Ed and Pattie, former inmates of institutions for the retarded, tell us in their own words.

Their autobiographies are not always pleasant reading. They describe the physical, mental, and emotional abuses heaped upon them throughout their youth and young adulthood; being spurned, neglected, and ultimately abandoned by family and friends; being labelled and stigmatized by social service professionals armed with tests and preconceptions; being incarcerated and depersonalized by the state.

Ed and Pattie survived these experiences—evidence, perhaps, of the indefatigable will of the human spirit to assert its essential humanity—but the wounds they have suffered, and the scars they bear, have not been overcome. They are now contributing, independent, members of society, but the stigma of ‘mental retardation’ remains.

Their stories are both true and representative—powerful indictments of our knowledge of, our thinking about, and our ministrations to, the mentally handicapped. The interviewers argue that Ed and Pattie challenge the very concept of ‘mental retardation.’ Retardation, they assert, is an ‘imaginary disease’; our attempts to ‘cure’ it are a hoax.

Read Ed’s and Pattie’s accounts and judge for yourself.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 246 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004234

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1982

    From: $22.46

    Regular Price: $29.95

    ISBN 9781442652064
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1982

    From: $22.46

    Regular Price: $29.95

Quick Overview

What does it mean to be ‘mentally retarded’? Professors Bogdan and Taylor have interviewed two experts, ‘Ed Murphy’ and ‘Pattie Burt,’ for answers. Ed and Pattie, former inmates of institutions for the retarded, tell us in their own words.

Inside Out: The Social Meaning of Mental Retardation

By Robert Bogdan and Steven J. Taylor

© 1982

‘We have to assume that the mind is working no matter what it looks like on the outside. We can’t just judge by appearance…If you take away the label they are human beings.’ Ed Murphy

What does it mean to be ‘mentally retarded’? Professors Bogdan and Taylor have interviewed two experts, ‘Ed Murphy’ and ‘Pattie Burt,’ for answers. Ed and Pattie, former inmates of institutions for the retarded, tell us in their own words.

Their autobiographies are not always pleasant reading. They describe the physical, mental, and emotional abuses heaped upon them throughout their youth and young adulthood; being spurned, neglected, and ultimately abandoned by family and friends; being labelled and stigmatized by social service professionals armed with tests and preconceptions; being incarcerated and depersonalized by the state.

Ed and Pattie survived these experiences—evidence, perhaps, of the indefatigable will of the human spirit to assert its essential humanity—but the wounds they have suffered, and the scars they bear, have not been overcome. They are now contributing, independent, members of society, but the stigma of ‘mental retardation’ remains.

Their stories are both true and representative—powerful indictments of our knowledge of, our thinking about, and our ministrations to, the mentally handicapped. The interviewers argue that Ed and Pattie challenge the very concept of ‘mental retardation.’ Retardation, they assert, is an ‘imaginary disease’; our attempts to ‘cure’ it are a hoax.

Read Ed’s and Pattie’s accounts and judge for yourself.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 246 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Robert Bogdan, Professor Emeritus of Cultural Foundations of Education and Sociology at Syracuse University, has published and lectured widely on the problems, treatment, and education of the handicapped.



    Steven J. Taylor (1949-2014) was Co-Director Centennial Professor of Disability Studies and Professor of Cultural Foundations of Education at Syracuse University. He served as an expert witness and consultant in civil rights cases on behalf of the mentally retarded and presented testimony in the U.S. Senate on deinstitutionalization.



    Seymour B. Sarason (1919-2010) was a distinguished Professor of Psychology at Yale University.