Journalism in Crisis: Bridging Theory and Practice for Democratic Media Strategies in Canada

Edited by Mike Gasher, Colette Brin, Christine Crowther, Gretchen King, Errol Salamon, and Simon Thibault

© 2016

Journalism in Crisis addresses the concerns of scholars, activists, and journalists committed to Canadian journalism as a democratic institution and as a set of democratic practices. The authors look within Canada and abroad for solutions for balancing the Canadian media ecology.

Public policies have been central to the creation and shaping of Canada’s media system and, rather than wait for new technologies or economic models, the contributors offer concrete recommendations for how public policies can foster journalism that can support democratic life in twenty-first century Canada. Their work, which includes new theoretical perspectives and valuable discussions of journalism practices in public, private, and community media, should be read by professional and citizen journalists, academics, media activists, policy makers and media audiences concerned about the future of democratic journalism in Canada.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 360 pages
  • Illustrations: 2
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004194

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2016

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    ISBN 9781442628885
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    ISBN 9781442637368
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2016

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Quick Overview

Journalism in Crisis addresses the concerns of scholars, activists, and journalists committed to Canadian journalism as a democratic institution and as a set of democratic practices.

Journalism in Crisis: Bridging Theory and Practice for Democratic Media Strategies in Canada

Edited by Mike Gasher, Colette Brin, Christine Crowther, Gretchen King, Errol Salamon, and Simon Thibault

© 2016

Journalism in Crisis addresses the concerns of scholars, activists, and journalists committed to Canadian journalism as a democratic institution and as a set of democratic practices. The authors look within Canada and abroad for solutions for balancing the Canadian media ecology.

Public policies have been central to the creation and shaping of Canada’s media system and, rather than wait for new technologies or economic models, the contributors offer concrete recommendations for how public policies can foster journalism that can support democratic life in twenty-first century Canada. Their work, which includes new theoretical perspectives and valuable discussions of journalism practices in public, private, and community media, should be read by professional and citizen journalists, academics, media activists, policy makers and media audiences concerned about the future of democratic journalism in Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 360 pages
  • Illustrations: 2
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Journalism in Crisis represents a major contribution to the field of journalism. Its approach, which uses the analogy of an ‘out of balance ecosystem’ to describe media in Canada, is a salient way to reconceptualize the landscape in order to prescribe a coherent, interesting, novel, and important set of new methods and possibilities."


    Mary Lynn Young, Graduate School of Journalism, University of British Columbia
  • Author Information

    Mike Gasher is a former journalist and professor in the Department of Journalism and director of the Centre for Broadcasting and Journalism Studies at Concordia University.


    Colette Brin is a professor in the Département d’information et de communication and director of the Centre d’études sur les médias at Laval University.


    Christine Crowther is a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University. She worked as a journalist with the CBC for fifteen years at the regional, national, and international levels.


    Gretchen King is a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University. She was news director at Montreal’s community radio station CKUT 90.3FM for ten years.


    Errol Salamon is Ph.D. candidate in communication at McGill University and former member of the Community News Collective of CKUT 90.3 FM in Montreal.


    Simon Thibault is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the Université de Montréal.
  • Table of contents

    Foreword: Journalism: Where to From Here?
    Marc Raboy and Florian Sauvageau

    Introduction: Whose Crisis? Journalism is Not Just for Journalists and Policy is Not Just for Wonks
    Christine Crowther, Simon Thibault, Errol Salamon and Gretchen King

    Section I: New Thinking About Journalism

    Chapter 1: Who Needs Objectivity? Journalism in Crisis, Journalism for Crisis
    Pinar Gurleyen and Robert A. Hackett

    Chapter 2: Critical Theory and Acts of Journalism: Expanding the Implied Audience
    Greg Nielsen

    Section II: New Journalism Policies

    Chapter 3: Media Policy Reform as a Foundation for Better Journalism
    David Skinner, Kathleen Cross and Robert A. Hackett

    Chapter 4: Public-Community Partnerships to Improve Local Media in Canada
    Karen Wirsig and Catherine Edwards

    Chapter 5: Understanding Canadian Local News Ecosystems: An International Comparative Approach
    Christopher Ali

    Chapter 6: Enabling Future Journalisms: Policy Challenges and Advocacy Initiatives in the Digital Age
    Arne Hintz

    Section III: New Journalism Practices

    Chapter 7: Rendering the Post-Integration Newsroom Right Side Up
    Chantal Francoeur

    Chapter 8: The Tweets that Bind Us: A G20 Case Study
    Sneha Kulkarni

    Chapter 9: Groundwire: Growing Community News Journalism in Canada
    Gretchen King, Chris Albinati, Anabel Khoo, Candace Mooers and Jacky Tuinstra Harrison

    Chapter 10: Journalism on the Ground in Rural Ontario
    Robert Washburn and Vincent Raynauld

    Chapter 11: Aboriginal Media in Australia and Canada and the Implications for Journalism Practice
    Michael Meadows

    Conclusion: Strategies Forward: A Future for Journalism in Canada
    Errol Salamon, Gretchen King, Christine Crowther and Simon Thibault