Les Universites canadiennes aujourd'hui / Canadian Universities Today

Edited by George Stanley & Guy Sylvestre

© 1961

Current concern with the problems of university education was reflected in the Royal Society’s choice of a theme for its 1960 annual symposium: “The Responsibilities of Canadian Universities.” The Fellows contributing to this symposium shed light on various problems, national and local, far-reaching and immediate, scientific and humanist, French- and English-Canadian, financial and intangible. All generally agree that the chief responsibility of the Canadian university today is to itself, to its own purpose and traditions, and hence all emphasize the importance of education rather than mere training.

James S. Thomson presents a comprehensive chapter on the general theme of this volume, emphasizing the quality of academic work and what such quality can mean in the university community and beyond. Léon Lortie also reflects on the responsibilities of Canadian universities, youthful as they are, before new challenges. Northrop Frye incisively examines the role of the liberal arts.

The responsibilities of the universities in relation to science are considered by three contributors. E.W.R. Steacle inquiries into the general question of how the university can best remain true to its own ends in an increasingly technical and specialized society. J.W.T. Spinks enumerates the results of queries across Canada on trends in the university research in science. L.P. Dugal surveys the contributions of the French universities of Canada in science and concludes that, with recent curriculum and financial changes, these universities are on the threshold of important advances.

Two other contributors consider problems of the French universities of Canada. Léon Lortie examines the new orientation of the French-speaking universities of Quebec and suggests further goals they could profitably pursue. Arthur Tremblay summarizes the significant changes in the teaching of the humanities which have been under consideration at Université Laval.

Two authors comment on the universities’ financial structures. J.J. Deutsch forecasts future demands and special calls on the universities’ financial resources. H.J. Fraser compares the financial responsibility of universities and of business in providing funds to maintain university activities.

Finally, G. de B. Robinson compares the situations of Canadian and Australian universities.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 108 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005685

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1961

    From: $14.21

    Regular Price: $18.95

    ISBN 9781487585556
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1961

    From: $14.21

    Regular Price: $18.95

Quick Overview

The Fellows contributing to this symposium shed light on various problems, national and local, far-reaching and immediate, scientific and humanist, French- and English-Canadian, financial and intangible.

Les Universites canadiennes aujourd'hui / Canadian Universities Today

Edited by George Stanley & Guy Sylvestre

© 1961

Current concern with the problems of university education was reflected in the Royal Society’s choice of a theme for its 1960 annual symposium: “The Responsibilities of Canadian Universities.” The Fellows contributing to this symposium shed light on various problems, national and local, far-reaching and immediate, scientific and humanist, French- and English-Canadian, financial and intangible. All generally agree that the chief responsibility of the Canadian university today is to itself, to its own purpose and traditions, and hence all emphasize the importance of education rather than mere training.

James S. Thomson presents a comprehensive chapter on the general theme of this volume, emphasizing the quality of academic work and what such quality can mean in the university community and beyond. Léon Lortie also reflects on the responsibilities of Canadian universities, youthful as they are, before new challenges. Northrop Frye incisively examines the role of the liberal arts.

The responsibilities of the universities in relation to science are considered by three contributors. E.W.R. Steacle inquiries into the general question of how the university can best remain true to its own ends in an increasingly technical and specialized society. J.W.T. Spinks enumerates the results of queries across Canada on trends in the university research in science. L.P. Dugal surveys the contributions of the French universities of Canada in science and concludes that, with recent curriculum and financial changes, these universities are on the threshold of important advances.

Two other contributors consider problems of the French universities of Canada. Léon Lortie examines the new orientation of the French-speaking universities of Quebec and suggests further goals they could profitably pursue. Arthur Tremblay summarizes the significant changes in the teaching of the humanities which have been under consideration at Université Laval.

Two authors comment on the universities’ financial structures. J.J. Deutsch forecasts future demands and special calls on the universities’ financial resources. H.J. Fraser compares the financial responsibility of universities and of business in providing funds to maintain university activities.

Finally, G. de B. Robinson compares the situations of Canadian and Australian universities.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 108 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    George F.G. Stanley is Professor Emeritus of History, Royal Military College and Mount Allison University.



    GUY SYLVESTRE was Associate Parliamentary Librarian, Ottawa.

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