Make the Night Hideous: Four English-Canadian Charivaris, 1881-1940

by Pauline Greenhill

© 2010

The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom from members of a community, usually to a newlywed couple, accompanied by a quĂȘte (a request for a treat or money in exchange for the noisy performance) and/or pranks. Up to the first decades of the twentieth century, charivaris were for the most part enacted to express disapproval of the relationship that was their focus, such as those between individuals of different ages, races, or religions. While later charivaris maintained the same rituals, their meaning changed to a welcoming of the marriage.

Make the Night Hideous explores this mysterious transformation using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants. Pauline Greenhill's unique and fascinating work explores the malleability of a tradition, its continuing value, and its contestation in a variety of discourses.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Canadian Social History Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.6in x 0.6in x 8.6in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP002770

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2010

    From: $28.46

    Regular Price: $37.95

    ISBN 9781442610156
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2010

    From: $55.50

    Regular Price: $74.00

    ISBN 9781442640771
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2010

    From: $27.71

    Regular Price: $36.95

Quick Overview

Make the Night Hideous explores mysterious transformation of the charivari using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants.

Make the Night Hideous: Four English-Canadian Charivaris, 1881-1940

by Pauline Greenhill

© 2010

The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom from members of a community, usually to a newlywed couple, accompanied by a quĂȘte (a request for a treat or money in exchange for the noisy performance) and/or pranks. Up to the first decades of the twentieth century, charivaris were for the most part enacted to express disapproval of the relationship that was their focus, such as those between individuals of different ages, races, or religions. While later charivaris maintained the same rituals, their meaning changed to a welcoming of the marriage.

Make the Night Hideous explores this mysterious transformation using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants. Pauline Greenhill's unique and fascinating work explores the malleability of a tradition, its continuing value, and its contestation in a variety of discourses.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Canadian Social History Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.6in x 0.6in x 8.6in
  • Reviews

    'Pauline Greenhill excels at using evidence culled from traditional activities to make trenchant observations about the role of culture in Canadians' lives. Make the Night Hideous provides insight into both the historical development of the charivari and the discourses that emerged in attempts to define and judge this practice. The extraordinary depth of Greenhill's research makes this book uniquely impressive and intriguing.'
    Patricia Sawin, Department of Anthropology and Program in Folklore, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Author Information

    Pauline Greenhill is a professor in the Department of Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Winnipeg.

  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations
    Preface and Acknowledgements

    1. Introduction
    2. "Murder Most Foul:" The Wetherill Charivari, Near Ottawa, 1881
    3. "A Man's Home is His Castle" Death at a Manitoba Charivari, 1909
    4. "What You Do in Daylight in Eyes of Public is No Harm:" Person, Place, and Defamation in Nova Scotia, 1917
    5. icturing Community: Les and Edna Babcock's Shivaree, Avonlea, Saskatchewan, 1940
    6. "Great Fun"/"A Nuisance:" Seeking Recent Shivaree Discourses

    References Cited

Related Titles