Making Law, Order, and Authority in British Columbia, 1821–1871

By Tina Loo

© 1994

In 1821, British Columbia was the exclusive domain of an independent Native population and the Hudson's Bay Company. By the time it entered Confederation some fifty years later, a British colonial government was firmly in place. In this book Tina Loo recounts the shaping of the new regime.
The history of pre-Confederation British Columbia is rich in lore and tales of adventure surrounding the fur trade, conflict between settlers and the Hudson's Bay Company, and, above all, the gold rush. Loo takes the familiar themes as a starting-point for fresh investigation. Her inquiry moves from the disciplinary practices of the Hudson's Bay Company, through the establishment of cuorts in the gold fields, to conflicts over the rule of juries and the nature of property. By detailing specific incidents and then drawing from a wife historical field to sketch in new background, she hs revised established hsitory.
Loo structures her analysis of events around the discourse of laissez-faire liberalism and shows how this discourse styled the law and order of the period. She writes with wit and elegance, bringing life to even the most technical aspects of her investigation. This is the first comprehensive legal history of British Columbia before Confederation.
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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 264 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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Book Formats

SKU# SP005554

  • PUBLISHED OCT 1994

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

    ISBN 9780802077844
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1994

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

Quick Overview

In 1821, British Columbia was the exclusive domain of an independent Native population and the Hudson's Bay Company. By te time it entered Confederation some fifty years later, a British colonial government was firmly in place. In this book Tina Loo recounts the shaping of the new regime.

Making Law, Order, and Authority in British Columbia, 1821–1871

By Tina Loo

© 1994

In 1821, British Columbia was the exclusive domain of an independent Native population and the Hudson's Bay Company. By the time it entered Confederation some fifty years later, a British colonial government was firmly in place. In this book Tina Loo recounts the shaping of the new regime.
The history of pre-Confederation British Columbia is rich in lore and tales of adventure surrounding the fur trade, conflict between settlers and the Hudson's Bay Company, and, above all, the gold rush. Loo takes the familiar themes as a starting-point for fresh investigation. Her inquiry moves from the disciplinary practices of the Hudson's Bay Company, through the establishment of cuorts in the gold fields, to conflicts over the rule of juries and the nature of property. By detailing specific incidents and then drawing from a wife historical field to sketch in new background, she hs revised established hsitory.
Loo structures her analysis of events around the discourse of laissez-faire liberalism and shows how this discourse styled the law and order of the period. She writes with wit and elegance, bringing life to even the most technical aspects of her investigation. This is the first comprehensive legal history of British Columbia before Confederation.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 264 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Tina Loo is Associate Professor at the Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto, and author of Toronto's Girl Problem: The Perils and Pleasures of the City, 1880-1930.

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