Making the Bible French: The Bible historiale and the Medieval Lay Reader

By Jeanette Patterson

© 2022

From the end of the thirteenth to the first decades of the sixteenth century, Guyart des Moulins’s Bible historiale was the predominant French translation of the Bible. Enhancing his translation with techniques borrowed from scholastic study, vernacular preaching, and secular fiction, Guyart produced one of the most popular, most widely copied French-language texts of the later Middle Ages.

Making the Bible French investigates how Guyart’s first-person authorial voice narrates translation choices in terms of anticipated reader reactions and frames the biblical text as an object of dialogue with his readers. It examines the translator’s narrative strategies to aid readers’ visualization of biblical stories, to encourage their identification with its characters, and to practice patient, self-reflexive reading. Finally, it traces how the Bible historiale manuscript tradition adapts and individualizes the Bible for each new intended reader, defying modern print-based and text-centred ideas about the Bible, canonicity, and translation.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006581

  • AVAILABLE JAN 2022

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781487508883
  • AVAILABLE JAN 2022

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

Quick Overview

Making the Bible French examines the Bible historiale, the most prolific and influential pre-Reformation French-language Bible.

Making the Bible French: The Bible historiale and the Medieval Lay Reader

By Jeanette Patterson

© 2022

From the end of the thirteenth to the first decades of the sixteenth century, Guyart des Moulins’s Bible historiale was the predominant French translation of the Bible. Enhancing his translation with techniques borrowed from scholastic study, vernacular preaching, and secular fiction, Guyart produced one of the most popular, most widely copied French-language texts of the later Middle Ages.

Making the Bible French investigates how Guyart’s first-person authorial voice narrates translation choices in terms of anticipated reader reactions and frames the biblical text as an object of dialogue with his readers. It examines the translator’s narrative strategies to aid readers’ visualization of biblical stories, to encourage their identification with its characters, and to practice patient, self-reflexive reading. Finally, it traces how the Bible historiale manuscript tradition adapts and individualizes the Bible for each new intended reader, defying modern print-based and text-centred ideas about the Bible, canonicity, and translation.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Jeanette L. Patterson is an assistant professor of French, Medieval Studies, and Translation Studies at Binghamton University.
  • Table of contents

    Illustrations
    Tables
    Acknowledgments

    Introduction

    1. Making the French Bible, or Making the Bible French

    2. Telling it Right: Confronting Reader Resistance

    3. Soothing Listeners’ Ears: Narrative Aesthetics and Poetic Faith

    4. Les paroles dont je vous ay fait mention: The Bible historiale’s Two Books of Job

    5. The Patient Reader

    Conclusion: Asking the Right Questions

    Appendix: Table of Selected Manuscripts
    Notes   
    Bibliography

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