Meaning and Textuality

By François Rastier Translated by Frank Collins and Paul Perron

© 1997

Historically there has been a wide gulf between European and Anglo/American thought on the philosophy of language, in part because it is often difficult to find important European works in English translation. Meaning and Textuality represents key elements of the ground-breaking new theory on signs and discourse that has come out of Europe in the last few decades.

Meaning and Textuality is an investigation into methods useful to the analysis of language and literature. Rastier seeks ways to better understand signs, with emphasis on their relation to action and culture. He proposes a theoretical framework for the semantic description and typology of texts. Towards this end he establishes a critical debate among various streams of research before arriving at a synthesis of literary semiotics, thematics, and linguistic semantics. The author sees this synthesis as a means by which to reconcile the rigour of linguistic analysis with the complexity of literary interpretation. In the later portion of the book he tests his propositions in a series of detailed investigations of French literary texts by Zola, Maupassant, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, and Jodelle. Each study examines a new problem such as narrative ambiguity or referential impression.

This book will be welcomed by scholars in any discipline concerned with discourse analysis and the close reading of texts.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP000918

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1997

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    Regular Price: $37.95

    ISBN 9780802080295
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Quick Overview

Rastier proposes a theoretical framework for the semantic description and typology of texts, establishing a critical debate among various streams of research before arriving at a synthesis of literary semiotics, thematics, and linguistic semantics.

Meaning and Textuality

By François Rastier Translated by Frank Collins and Paul Perron

© 1997

Historically there has been a wide gulf between European and Anglo/American thought on the philosophy of language, in part because it is often difficult to find important European works in English translation. Meaning and Textuality represents key elements of the ground-breaking new theory on signs and discourse that has come out of Europe in the last few decades.

Meaning and Textuality is an investigation into methods useful to the analysis of language and literature. Rastier seeks ways to better understand signs, with emphasis on their relation to action and culture. He proposes a theoretical framework for the semantic description and typology of texts. Towards this end he establishes a critical debate among various streams of research before arriving at a synthesis of literary semiotics, thematics, and linguistic semantics. The author sees this synthesis as a means by which to reconcile the rigour of linguistic analysis with the complexity of literary interpretation. In the later portion of the book he tests his propositions in a series of detailed investigations of French literary texts by Zola, Maupassant, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, and Jodelle. Each study examines a new problem such as narrative ambiguity or referential impression.

This book will be welcomed by scholars in any discipline concerned with discourse analysis and the close reading of texts.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    François Rastier is Professor of Semantics and Director of Research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris.



    Frank Collins is Associate Professor of French and Medieval Studies, University of Toronto.



    Paul Perron is former Chair of the Department of French Studies at the University of Toronto and Principal emeritus of University College.

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