Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties

By Marko Dumančić

© 2020

Men Out of Focus charts conversations and polemics about masculinity in Soviet cinema and popular media during the liberal period – often described as "The Thaw" – between the death of Stalin in 1953 and the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. The book shows how the filmmakers of the long 1960s built stories around male protagonists who felt disoriented by a world that was becoming increasingly suburbanized, rebellious, consumerist, household-oriented, and scientifically complex. The dramatic tension of 1960s cinema revolved around the male protagonists’ inability to navigate the challenges of postwar life.

Selling over three billion tickets annually, the Soviet film industry became a fault line of postwar cultural contestation. By examining both the discussions surrounding the period’s most controversial movies as well as the cultural context in which these debates happened, the book captures the official and popular reactions to the dizzying transformations of Soviet society after Stalin.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 71
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005504

  • AVAILABLE JUL 2020

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781487505257
  • AVAILABLE JUL 2020

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

Quick Overview

Men Out of Focus examines how and why the Soviet public came to worry openly about the state of masculinity during the 1950s and 1960s – and how a perceived crisis really stood in for broader fears.

Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties

By Marko Dumančić

© 2020

Men Out of Focus charts conversations and polemics about masculinity in Soviet cinema and popular media during the liberal period – often described as "The Thaw" – between the death of Stalin in 1953 and the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. The book shows how the filmmakers of the long 1960s built stories around male protagonists who felt disoriented by a world that was becoming increasingly suburbanized, rebellious, consumerist, household-oriented, and scientifically complex. The dramatic tension of 1960s cinema revolved around the male protagonists’ inability to navigate the challenges of postwar life.

Selling over three billion tickets annually, the Soviet film industry became a fault line of postwar cultural contestation. By examining both the discussions surrounding the period’s most controversial movies as well as the cultural context in which these debates happened, the book captures the official and popular reactions to the dizzying transformations of Soviet society after Stalin.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 71
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Marko Dumančić is an associate professor of Russian and East European History at Western Kentucky University.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction: Men in Need of Saving?

    1. What Was Stalinist Masculinity and Why Did It Change?

    2. Being a Dad Is Not for Sissies

    3. Generational Conflict, Soviet Style

    4. The Trouble with Women: Consumerism and the Death of Rugged Masculinity

    5. Our Friend the Atom? Science as a Threat to Masculinity

    6. De-Heroization and Pan-European Masculinity Crisis

    Epilogue: The End of the Long Sixties and the Fate of the Superfluous Man

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