Military Workfare: The Soldier and Social Citizenship in Canada

By Deborah Cowen

© 2008

Despite the centrality of war in social and political thought, the military remains marginal in academic and public conceptions of citizenship, and the soldier seems to be thought of as a peripheral or even exceptional player. Military Workfare draws on five decades of restricted archival material and critical theories on war and politics to examine how a military model of work, discipline, domestic space, and the social self has redefined citizenship in the wake of the Second World War. It is also a study of the complex, often concealed ways in which organized violence continues to shape national belonging.

What does the military have to do with welfare? Could war-work be at the centre of social rights in both historic and contemporary contexts? Deborah Cowen undertakes such important questions with the citizenship of the soldier front and centre in the debate. Connecting global geopolitics to intimate struggles over entitlement and identity at home, she challenges our assumptions about the national geographies of citizenship, proposing that the soldier has, in fact, long been the model citizen of the social state. Paying particular attention to the rise of neoliberalism and the emergence of civilian workfare, Military Workfare looks to the institution of the military to unsettle established ideas about the past and raise new questions about our collective future.

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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Comparative Political Economy and Public Policy
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.0in x 9.2in
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SKU# SP002419

  • PUBLISHED APR 2008

    From: $51.00

    Regular Price: $68.00

    ISBN 9780802092335
  • PUBLISHED APR 2008

    From: $49.50

    Regular Price: $66.00

Quick Overview

Paying particular attention to the rise of neoliberalism and the emergence of civilian workfare, Military Workfare looks to the institution of the military to unsettle established ideas about the past and raise new questions about our collective future.

Military Workfare: The Soldier and Social Citizenship in Canada

By Deborah Cowen

© 2008

Despite the centrality of war in social and political thought, the military remains marginal in academic and public conceptions of citizenship, and the soldier seems to be thought of as a peripheral or even exceptional player. Military Workfare draws on five decades of restricted archival material and critical theories on war and politics to examine how a military model of work, discipline, domestic space, and the social self has redefined citizenship in the wake of the Second World War. It is also a study of the complex, often concealed ways in which organized violence continues to shape national belonging.

What does the military have to do with welfare? Could war-work be at the centre of social rights in both historic and contemporary contexts? Deborah Cowen undertakes such important questions with the citizenship of the soldier front and centre in the debate. Connecting global geopolitics to intimate struggles over entitlement and identity at home, she challenges our assumptions about the national geographies of citizenship, proposing that the soldier has, in fact, long been the model citizen of the social state. Paying particular attention to the rise of neoliberalism and the emergence of civilian workfare, Military Workfare looks to the institution of the military to unsettle established ideas about the past and raise new questions about our collective future.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Comparative Political Economy and Public Policy
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.0in x 9.2in
  • Reviews

    Cowen's work is engaging and wonderfully provocative study on the link between warfare and welfare. These topics are not often considered together, but Cowen makes a convincing case for why they should be.
    Carolyn Gallaher, Environment and Planning D: Society & Space, vol 28:03:2010

    Cowen provides a comprehensive and intriguing study of specific and sustained connections that link welfare, warfare and citizenship.
    Noya Rimalt, Canadian Journal of Law & Society, vol 25:02:10
  • Author Information

    Deborah Cowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto.

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