My Karst and My City and Other Essays

By Scipio Slataper
Edited, with an Introduction and Notes, by Elena Coda
Translated by Nicholas Benson and Elena Coda

© 2021

Scipio Slataper is one of the most prominent writers from the Italian town of Trieste. Before the onslaught of World War One, Trieste was a unique urban environment and the largest port in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It was a financially powerful city and a cosmopolitan centre where Slavic, Germanic, and Italian cultures intersected. Much of Slataper’s oeuvre is highly influenced by Trieste’s cultural complexity and its multi-ethnic environment.

Slataper’s major literary achievement, My Karst and My City – a fictionalized, lyrical autobiography, translated here in its entirety – offers a unique example of an Italian modernist narrative, one that is influenced both by Slataper’s collaboration with the Florentine journal La Voce, and by the Germanic and Scandinavian literature that he absorbed while living in Trieste. My Karst and My City, together with the excerpts from his reflections on Ibsen and other critical essays included here, adds a new voice and a different dimension to our understanding of European modernism.

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Product Details

  • Series: Lorenzo Da Ponte Italian Library
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006519

  • AVAILABLE MAR 2021

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781487508227
  • AVAILABLE MAR 2021

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

Quick Overview

My Karst and My City and Other Essays is the first book available in English on the work of Scipio Slataper, one of the most prominent intellectuals active in Trieste at the turn of the twentieth century.

My Karst and My City and Other Essays

By Scipio Slataper
Edited, with an Introduction and Notes, by Elena Coda
Translated by Nicholas Benson and Elena Coda

© 2021

Scipio Slataper is one of the most prominent writers from the Italian town of Trieste. Before the onslaught of World War One, Trieste was a unique urban environment and the largest port in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It was a financially powerful city and a cosmopolitan centre where Slavic, Germanic, and Italian cultures intersected. Much of Slataper’s oeuvre is highly influenced by Trieste’s cultural complexity and its multi-ethnic environment.

Slataper’s major literary achievement, My Karst and My City – a fictionalized, lyrical autobiography, translated here in its entirety – offers a unique example of an Italian modernist narrative, one that is influenced both by Slataper’s collaboration with the Florentine journal La Voce, and by the Germanic and Scandinavian literature that he absorbed while living in Trieste. My Karst and My City, together with the excerpts from his reflections on Ibsen and other critical essays included here, adds a new voice and a different dimension to our understanding of European modernism.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Lorenzo Da Ponte Italian Library
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Scipio Slataper (1888–1915) was an Italian writer, most famous for his lyrical essay My Karst. He is considered, alongside Italo Svevo, as the initiator of the prolific tradition of Italian literature in Trieste.


    Elena Coda is associate head of the School of Languages and Cultures and associate professor of Italian at Purdue University.


    Nicholas Benson is a translator.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction

    A Note on the Texts and Their Translations

    1. My Karst and My City 

    2. From Political Writings: Letters on Trieste

    Trieste Has No Cultural Traditions
    The Life of the Spirit

    3. From Literary and Critical Writings

    To Young Italian Intellectuals
    Futurism
    Crepuscular Confusion 

    4. From Ibsen 

    5. From Political Writings

    Irredentism Today
    The National and Political Future of Trieste 
    National Rights Are Affirmed with War

    6. From Letters to Three Women Friends

    To Elody (Firenze, 6 June 1912) 
    To Gigetta (Firenze, 8 February 1912)
    To Gigetta (23 November 1915)

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