Nikolai Gogol: Performing Hybrid Identity

By Yuliya Ilchuk

© 2021

One of the great writers of the nineteenth century, Nikolai Gogol was born and raised in Ukraine before he was lionized and canonized in Russia. The ambiguities within his subversive, ironic works are matched by those which surround the debate over his national identity. This book presents a completely new assessment of the problem: rather than adopting the predominant "either/or" perspective – wherein Gogol is seen as either Ukrainian or Russian – it shows how his cultural identity was a product of negotiation with imperial and national cultural codes and values. By examining Gogol’s ambivalent self-fashioning, language performance, and textual practices, this book shows how Gogol played with both imperial and local sources of identity and turned his hybridity into a project of subtle cultural resistance.

Ilchuk provides a comprehensive account of assimilation and hybridization of Ukrainians in the Russian empire, arguing that Russia’s imperial culture has depended on Ukraine and the participation of Ukrainian intellectuals in its development. Ilchuk also introduces innovative computer-assisted methods of textual analysis to demonstrate the palimpsest-like quality of Gogol’s texts and national identity.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006522

  • AVAILABLE JAN 2021

    From: $52.50

    Regular Price: $70.00

    ISBN 9781487508258
  • AVAILABLE FEB 2021

    From: $52.50

    Regular Price: $70.00

Quick Overview

This innovative study of one of the most important writers of Russian Golden Age literature argues that Gogol adopted a deliberate hybrid identity to mimic and mock the pretensions of the dominant culture.

Nikolai Gogol: Performing Hybrid Identity

By Yuliya Ilchuk

© 2021

One of the great writers of the nineteenth century, Nikolai Gogol was born and raised in Ukraine before he was lionized and canonized in Russia. The ambiguities within his subversive, ironic works are matched by those which surround the debate over his national identity. This book presents a completely new assessment of the problem: rather than adopting the predominant "either/or" perspective – wherein Gogol is seen as either Ukrainian or Russian – it shows how his cultural identity was a product of negotiation with imperial and national cultural codes and values. By examining Gogol’s ambivalent self-fashioning, language performance, and textual practices, this book shows how Gogol played with both imperial and local sources of identity and turned his hybridity into a project of subtle cultural resistance.

Ilchuk provides a comprehensive account of assimilation and hybridization of Ukrainians in the Russian empire, arguing that Russia’s imperial culture has depended on Ukraine and the participation of Ukrainian intellectuals in its development. Ilchuk also introduces innovative computer-assisted methods of textual analysis to demonstrate the palimpsest-like quality of Gogol’s texts and national identity.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Illustrations: 7
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Yuliya Ilchuk is an assistant professor of Slavic Literature and Culture at Stanford University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments
    Note on Transliteration
    List of Illustrations

    Introduction

    1. The Negotiation of Ukrainian Identities in the Russian Empire
    2. Gogol’s Self-Fashioning and Performance of Identity in the 1830s
    3. Hybrid Language and Narrative Performance in Evenings on a Farm Near Dikan′ka 
    4. Heteroglossia, Speech Masks, and the Synthesis of Languages
    5. Gogol’s Texts as Palimpsest: Taras Bulba and Dead Souls 
    6.  The Posthumous Publications and Translations of Gogol’s Texts   

    Afterword
    Notes
    Appendix
    Bibliography
    Index

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