Ovid and the Renaissance Body

By Goran Stanivukovic

© 2001

Body has been one of the main preoccupations of current Renaissance historiography and current critical theory. Both the literary representation of the body and the construction of the material body in Renaissance anatomical and medical discourses have been used to explore the dynamics of early modern sexuality, gender, and society. Yet the influence of Ovid's texts on the construction of the Renaissance discourses of gender, sexuality, and subjectivity has not been fully explored.

This collection of original essays uses contemporary theory to examine Renaissance writers' reworking of Ovid's texts in order to analyze the strategies in the construction of the early modern discourses of gender, sexuality, and writing. The volume is divided into three parts. Part I explores literary and dramatic allusions to Ovid in relation to early modern ideologies of subjectivity and anxieties about identification and desire. Part II illustrates the appropriation of Ovidian myths by poets and dramatists interested in the articulation of agency. Part III demonstrates how various points of intertextuality between Ovid and English Renaissance writers ranging from Marlowe to Milton contributed to early modern epistemologies and discourse of embodiment, spectatorship, and print culture.

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  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.9in x 9.3in
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  • PUBLISHED OCT 2001

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Quick Overview

This collection of original essays uses contemporary theory to examine Renaissance writers’ reworking of Ovid’s texts in order to analyze the strategies in the construction of the early modern discourses of gender, sexuality, and writing.

Ovid and the Renaissance Body

By Goran Stanivukovic

© 2001

Body has been one of the main preoccupations of current Renaissance historiography and current critical theory. Both the literary representation of the body and the construction of the material body in Renaissance anatomical and medical discourses have been used to explore the dynamics of early modern sexuality, gender, and society. Yet the influence of Ovid's texts on the construction of the Renaissance discourses of gender, sexuality, and subjectivity has not been fully explored.

This collection of original essays uses contemporary theory to examine Renaissance writers' reworking of Ovid's texts in order to analyze the strategies in the construction of the early modern discourses of gender, sexuality, and writing. The volume is divided into three parts. Part I explores literary and dramatic allusions to Ovid in relation to early modern ideologies of subjectivity and anxieties about identification and desire. Part II illustrates the appropriation of Ovidian myths by poets and dramatists interested in the articulation of agency. Part III demonstrates how various points of intertextuality between Ovid and English Renaissance writers ranging from Marlowe to Milton contributed to early modern epistemologies and discourse of embodiment, spectatorship, and print culture.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.9in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Goran Stanivukovic is a professor in the English Department at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction: Ovid and the Renaissance Body
    Goran V. Stanivukovic, Saint Mary’s University

    Part I: Identification and Desire

    Ovidian Subjectivities in Early Modern Lyric: Identification and Desire in Petrarch and Louise Labé
    Carla Freccero, University of California at Santa Cruz

    Imagining Heterosexuality in the Epyllia
    Jim Ellis, University of Calgary

    Inversion, Metamorphosis, and Sexual Difference: Female Same-Sex Desire in Ovid and Lyly
    Mark Dooley, University of Teesside

    A Garden of Her Own: Marvell’s Nymph and the Order of Nature
    Morgan Holmes, Wilfrid Laurier University

    ‘Male deformities’: Narcissus and the Reformation of Courtly Manners in Cynthia's Revels
    Mario Digangi, CUNY.

    Arms and the Women: The Ovidian Eroticism of Harington’s Ariosto
    Ian Frederick Moulton, Arizona State University

    Part II: Speech, Voice, and Embodiment

    Localizing Disembodied Voice in Sandys’s Englished ‘Narcissus and Echo’
    Gina Bloom, Lawrence University

    The Ovidian Hermaphrodite: Moralizations by Peend and Spenser
    Michael Pincombe, University of Newcastle upon Tyne

    Ovid and the Dilemma of the Cuckold in English Renaissance Drama
    Bruce Boehrer, Florida State University

    Part Ill: Textualization

    Lyrical Wax in Ovid, Marlowe, and Donne
    Raphael Lyne, New Hall, Cambridge

    Engendering Metamorphoses: Milton and the Ovidian Corpus
    Elizabeth Sauer, Brock University

    The Girl He Left Behind: Ovidian imitatio and the Body of Echo in Spenser’s ‘Epithalamion’
    Judith Deitch, University of Toronto

    ‘If that which is lost be not found’: Monumental Bodies, Spectacular Bodies in The Winter’s Tale
    Lori Humphrey Newcomb, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Afterword
    Valerie Traub, University of Michigan

    Contributors
    Index

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