Persons and Other Things: Exploring the Philosophy of the Hebrew Bible

By Mark Glouberman

© 2021

The Hebrew Bible is a philosophical testament. Abraham, the first biblical philosopher, calls out to the world in God’s name exactly as Plato calls out in the name of the Forms.

Abraham comes forward as a critic of pagan thought about, specifically, persons. Moses, to whom the baton is passed, spells out the practical implications of the Bible’s core anthropological teachings.

In Persons and Other Things Mark Glouberman explores the Bible’s philosophy, roughing out in the course of a defence of it how men and women who see themselves in the biblical portrayal (as he argues that most of us do once the "religious" glare is reduced) are committed to conduct their personal affairs, arrange their social ties, and act in the natural world.

Persons and Other Things is also the author’s testament about the practice of philosophy. Glouberman sets out, and in the chapters that pursue the theme he puts into practice, the lessons he has acquired as a lifelong learner about thinking philosophically, about writing philosophy, and about philosophers.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006587

  • AVAILABLE MAY 2021

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

    ISBN 9781487508982
  • AVAILABLE MAY 2021

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

Quick Overview

Persons and Other Things looks closely at the Bible as a philosophical work, asking insightful questions about how to interpret the Hebrew Bible, what it means to be Jewish, and how to live a meaningful and moral life.

Persons and Other Things: Exploring the Philosophy of the Hebrew Bible

By Mark Glouberman

© 2021

The Hebrew Bible is a philosophical testament. Abraham, the first biblical philosopher, calls out to the world in God’s name exactly as Plato calls out in the name of the Forms.

Abraham comes forward as a critic of pagan thought about, specifically, persons. Moses, to whom the baton is passed, spells out the practical implications of the Bible’s core anthropological teachings.

In Persons and Other Things Mark Glouberman explores the Bible’s philosophy, roughing out in the course of a defence of it how men and women who see themselves in the biblical portrayal (as he argues that most of us do once the "religious" glare is reduced) are committed to conduct their personal affairs, arrange their social ties, and act in the natural world.

Persons and Other Things is also the author’s testament about the practice of philosophy. Glouberman sets out, and in the chapters that pursue the theme he puts into practice, the lessons he has acquired as a lifelong learner about thinking philosophically, about writing philosophy, and about philosophers.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Mark Glouberman is an instructor in the Department of Philosophy at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.
  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Preamble … with a loosened tie

    Principles

    1. Bibleism and Judaism: Four and a Half Dogmas of Bible Interpretation
    2. Godless the Bible’s Philosophy Isn’t
    3. “Jew” as a Category Label: Philosophy on the Holocaust
    4. Hero, Israel: Troy and the Torah

    Passages

    5. “On one leg”: The Stability of Monotheism
    6. “Where were you?”: The Logic of the Book of Job
    7. “Let them have dominion”: The Bible and the Natural World
    8. “Because … God rested”: Philosophy on the Sabbath Day
    9. “In the day that you shall eat”: Do and Die

    People

    10. Eat, Pray, Smoke: Halakhah for the Goldsteins and the Goyim
    11. God Loves You, Christopher Hitchens
    12. Jerry and Jewry: Ethnicity and Humanity in G.A. Cohen
    13. “O God, O Montreal!”: Charles Taylor and Turbo-Charged Humanism
    14. A Plea for Ontology: Thomas Nagel’s Mind and Cosmos
    15. Phenomenology and Analysis: A Bridge over the Waters

    Epilogue: The Acts of the Philosophers

    Finale: “The rest is the commentary thereof”
     
    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index

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