Pirates, Traitors, and Apostates: Renegade Identities in Early Modern English Writing

By Laurie Ellinghausen

© 2018

Examining tales of notorious figures in Renaissance England, including the mercenary Thomas Stukeley, the Barbary corsair John Ward, and the wandering adventurers the Sherley brothers, Laurie Ellinghausen sheds new light on the construction of the early modern renegade and its depiction in English prose, poetry, and drama during a period of capitalist expansion.

Unlike previous scholarship which has focused heavily on positioning rogue behaviour within the dialogue of race, gender, religion, and nationalism, Pirates, Traitors, and Apostates: Renegade Identities in Early Modern England shows how domestic issues of class and occupation exerted a major influence on representations of renegades, and heightened their appeal to the diverse audiences of early modern England. By looking at renegade tales from this perspective, Ellinghausen reveals a renegade, who, despite being stigmatized as an outsider, becomes a major profiteer during the period of early expansion, and ultimately a key figure in the creation of a national English identity.  

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 220 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.8in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP004818

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2018

    From: $41.25

    Regular Price: $55.00

    ISBN 9781487502683
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2018

    From: $41.25

    Regular Price: $55.00

Quick Overview

Examining tales of notorious figures in Renaissance England, Laurie Ellinghausen sheds new light on the construction of the early modern renegade and its depiction in English prose, poetry, and drama during a period of capitalist expansion.

Pirates, Traitors, and Apostates: Renegade Identities in Early Modern English Writing

By Laurie Ellinghausen

© 2018

Examining tales of notorious figures in Renaissance England, including the mercenary Thomas Stukeley, the Barbary corsair John Ward, and the wandering adventurers the Sherley brothers, Laurie Ellinghausen sheds new light on the construction of the early modern renegade and its depiction in English prose, poetry, and drama during a period of capitalist expansion.

Unlike previous scholarship which has focused heavily on positioning rogue behaviour within the dialogue of race, gender, religion, and nationalism, Pirates, Traitors, and Apostates: Renegade Identities in Early Modern England shows how domestic issues of class and occupation exerted a major influence on representations of renegades, and heightened their appeal to the diverse audiences of early modern England. By looking at renegade tales from this perspective, Ellinghausen reveals a renegade, who, despite being stigmatized as an outsider, becomes a major profiteer during the period of early expansion, and ultimately a key figure in the creation of a national English identity.  

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 220 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.8in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘Ellinghausen’s study is driven by a combination of contemporary affect and early modern humoural theories.’


    Grace Moore
    TLS July 20 2018

    "Laurie Ellinghausen's excellent book Pirates, Traitors, and Apostates makes a significant contribution to scholarship on the early British Empire by bringing a shrewd analysis of social relations to bear on representations of England’s emerging global economy. Ellinghausen’s assertion that renegades such as pirates and traitors need to be understood through domestic ideologies of class and social mobility is fresh and compelling, and her study will be of great value to a wide range of early modern scholars, including those interested in Renaissance drama, travel literature, class and the economy, affect studies, and globalization."


    Michelle M. Dowd, Hudson Strode professor of English, The University of Alabama
  • Author Information

    Laurie Ellinghausen is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.
  • Table of contents

    1. "Unquiet Hotspurs": Stukeley, Vernon, and the Renegade
    2. "We are of the Sea!": Masterless Identity and Transnational Context in A Christian Turned Turk
    3. "lend us your lament": Purser and Clinton on the Scaffold
    4. "extravagant thoughts": The Sherley Brothers and the Future of Renegade England
    5. "skillful in their art": Criminal Biography and the Renegade Inheritance