political science is for everybody: an introduction to political science

Edited by amy l. atchison

© 2021

political science is for everybody is the first intersectionality-mainstreamed textbook written for introductory political science courses. While political science and politics are for everybody, political institutions (and the discipline of political science) are neither neutral nor unbiased. When we write political science textbooks that obscure the differences in how groups experience and interact with political institutions, we do students a disservice. This book exposes students to these differences while also bringing marginalized voices to the fore in political science, allowing more students to see their lived experiences reflected in the pages of their political science textbook. Bringing together a diverse group of contributors, political science is for everybody teaches all the basics of political science while showing that representation matters, both in politics and in the political science classroom.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Illustrations: 25
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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Quick Overview

This book is the first intersectionality-mainstreamed textbook written for introductory political science courses.

political science is for everybody: an introduction to political science

Edited by amy l. atchison

© 2021

political science is for everybody is the first intersectionality-mainstreamed textbook written for introductory political science courses. While political science and politics are for everybody, political institutions (and the discipline of political science) are neither neutral nor unbiased. When we write political science textbooks that obscure the differences in how groups experience and interact with political institutions, we do students a disservice. This book exposes students to these differences while also bringing marginalized voices to the fore in political science, allowing more students to see their lived experiences reflected in the pages of their political science textbook. Bringing together a diverse group of contributors, political science is for everybody teaches all the basics of political science while showing that representation matters, both in politics and in the political science classroom.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Illustrations: 25
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    amy l. atchison is an associate professor of Political Science and International Relations at Valparaiso University.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction
    Background to political science is for everybody
    Why this book?
    The Structure of the Book
    Final Note

    Section I: The Foundations of Politics

    1. What are the Foundations of Politics?
    Overview
    The Basics of Political Theory
    The Basics of Political Ideologies
    The Basics of Political Behavior
    Putting the Pieces Together: Affective Polarization, Voting, and Democratic Backsliding
    Summary

    2. Political Theory and the Intersectional Quest for The Good Life
    What is the Good Life?
    Context Matters
    Section One: The Logic Intersectionality: A Theoretical Primer
    Section Two: Who Qualifies for the Good Life?
    Section Three: Does the State Have a Role in Facilitating the Good Life?
    Summary

    3. Political Ideologies
    What is an ideology?
    Four Contemporary Ideologies
    Conclusion
    Summary

    4. Civil Society and Social Movements
    Characteristics and Functions : What is Civil Society & What Does it Do?
    Social Movements & Contentious Politics: Distinguishing the Range of Civil Society
    All about Social Movements: What brings people to movements, and what do movements do?
    What (Additional) Work do Movement Do? Other Modes of Political Engagement
    What impact do social movements have?

    5. Political Parties
    Overview
    What are Political Parties?
    What do Political Parties Do?
    Party Membership
    Party Systems
    Is the Party Over?

    6. Electoral Systems and Representation
    Overview
    Building Blocks of Election Systems
    Mandating Inclusion via Quotas
    The Symbolic Effects of Representative Diversity
    Section II: Comparative Politics

     Section II What is Comparative Politics?

    7. Introduction
    What is comparative politics?
    Why do we study comparative politics?
    Main foci in comparative politics
    Comparative methods of analysis
    Chapter summary

    8. Executives
    Introduction
    Executive Government: The Basics
    The Modern Executive: How Did We Get Here?
    Presidentialism, Parliamentarism, and Semi-Presidentialism
    Non-Democratic Governments and the Executive
    Power, Politics, and Executives: Who Gets to be a Chief Executive?
    Cabinets and Intersectionality
    Bureaucracies and Intersectionality
    Why Intersectional Identities Matter for Executive Politics
    Summary

    9. Legislatures
    Introduction
    Types of Legislatures and Legislative Organization
    Who Has Power and Influence?
    Representation and Legislatures
    Summary

    10. Public Policy Through an Intersectional Lens
    Introduction
    Definitions and concepts: What is public policy?
    The policy cycle: Understanding how policies are made
    What does the policy cycle as seen through an intersectionality lens look like?
    Critiques of intersectionality and intersectional thinking and their relationship to public policy
    Analyzing public policy change through an intersectional policy regime framework
    Examples of intersectional policy analysis
    1. Mainstreaming intersectionality: Making public policy sensitive to intersectional challenges?
    2. The Comparative Politics Turn in Intersectional Public Policy
    3. The positionality component within intersectional public policy studies
    Summary

    11. Courts and the Law
    Overview
    Constitutions
    The Courts
    Legal Systems
    Conclusion
    Summary
    Concluding Questions
    End Notes

    Section III: International Relations

    12. What is International Relations?
    What is International Relations and Why do We Study It?
    How Has IR as a Discipline Evolved? What Are the Main Approaches to the Study of IR?
    Thinking Differently About IR
    International Politics and International Relations: A Matter of Perspective
    The Globalization of IR
    Summary

    13. International Political Economy
    Introduction
    The Everyday Turn in IPE
    Summary

    14. Security and Conflict
    Introduction
    Intersectionality and Security
    Meanings of Security
    Distributions of Security
    Experiences of Security
    Discourses of Security
    Summary: Intersectional Security

    15. International Law & Human Rights
    Introduction
    What is international law?
    The Concept of Human Rights
    Summary

    16. International Organizations
    Introduction
    Basic Architecture of Global Governance: IGOs in World Politics
    IGOs and the Problem of Global Governance
    Designing IGOs: The Influence of Power
    Countering the Power Imbalance: The Role of NGOs
    Summary
    Conclusion
    Summing Up
    The Politics of Division
    Identity Politics are not Bad Politics
    Final Thoughts
    End Notes

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