Re-Situating Identities: The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture

© 1996

Re-Situating Identities signals a crucial move away from the extremes of statistical reductionism and textual preoccupation which have marked race and ethnic studies. Instead, inspired by an insistence on concrete social and political change, these essays seek to re-energize the field by systematic and empirically grounded investigation of the production of identities in power relationships. Working with ethnographic data, life histories, and historical documents, sociologists, anthropologists and cultural theorists from Britain, Canada, and the United States present a diverse array of scenarios from courtrooms and classrooms to diasporas, communities, state memorials, and media representations. Each scenario raises an array of critical questions of existing theory and policy: What is the impact of multiculturalist policies? Should the term "race" still be used? What are the controversies surrounding the concept of "black cultures"? What part do race and ethnicity play in the construction of collective memories? What part do notions of home play in the organization of racial exclusion? What can we learn about racism from life stories? How is nationalism mediated by the local experiences it attempts to supersede? And what does the local mean and what is its relationship to globalization?

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 15181

Book Formats

SKU# HE000231

  • PUBLISHED MAR 1996

    From: $30.56

    Regular Price: $35.95

    ISBN 9781551110714
  • PUBLISHED MAR 1996
    From: $29.95

Quick Overview

These essays seek to re-energize race and ethnic studies by moving away from the extremes of statistical reductionism and textual preoccupation that have marked the field and focusing instead on systematic and empirically grounded investigations of the production of identities in power relationships.

Re-Situating Identities: The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture

© 1996

Re-Situating Identities signals a crucial move away from the extremes of statistical reductionism and textual preoccupation which have marked race and ethnic studies. Instead, inspired by an insistence on concrete social and political change, these essays seek to re-energize the field by systematic and empirically grounded investigation of the production of identities in power relationships. Working with ethnographic data, life histories, and historical documents, sociologists, anthropologists and cultural theorists from Britain, Canada, and the United States present a diverse array of scenarios from courtrooms and classrooms to diasporas, communities, state memorials, and media representations. Each scenario raises an array of critical questions of existing theory and policy: What is the impact of multiculturalist policies? Should the term "race" still be used? What are the controversies surrounding the concept of "black cultures"? What part do race and ethnicity play in the construction of collective memories? What part do notions of home play in the organization of racial exclusion? What can we learn about racism from life stories? How is nationalism mediated by the local experiences it attempts to supersede? And what does the local mean and what is its relationship to globalization?

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    This ethnographically adventurous but finely balanced volume amply demonstrates the intellectual excitement that results when nuanced cultural analysis is infused with social and political critique. I will be assigning this text in a course on the politics of culture.


    Noel Dyck, Department of Anthropology, Simon Fraser University
  • Author Information

    Vered Amit-Talai is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. She is the author of Armenians in London: The Management of Social Boundaries and the co-editor of Urban Lives: Fragmentation and Resistance and Youth Cultures: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.



    Caroline Knowles is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. She is the author of Race, Discourse, and Labourism as well as Family Boundaries: The Invention of Normality and Dangerousness.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction: Against Parochialism and Fragmentation 

    Part I: Race and Racism
    Introduction

    1. Robert Miles, Rudy Torres: Does "Race" Matter? Transatlantic Perspectives on Racism after "Race Relations"
    2. Caroline Knowles: Racism, Biography, and Psychiatry
    3. Phil Cohen: Homing Devices

    Part II: The Politics of Identity
    Introduction

    1. Vered Amit-Talai: The Minority Circuit: Identity Politics and the Professionalization of Ethnic Activism
    2. Val Morrison: Mediating Identity: Kashtin, the Media, and the Oka Crisis
    3. Anthony Synnott/David Howes: Canada's Visible Minorities: Identity and Representation
    4. Alrick Cambridge: The Beauty of Valuing Black Cultures

    Part III: Memories and Histories

    1. Henri Lustiger-Thaler: Remembering Forgetfully
    2. Tracy E. K'Meyer: Shared Memory in Community: Oral  History, Community, and Race
    3. Robert Paine: Dilemmas of Discovery: Europeans and "America"

    Part IV: Nationalism and Transnationalism

    1. Anthony P. Cohen: Owning the Nation and the Personal Nature of Nationalism: Locality and the Rhetoric of Nationhood in Scotland
    2. Parminder Bhachu: The Multiple Landscapes of Transnational Asian Women in the Diaspora

    Index

By the Same Author(s)

Related Titles