Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender History

Edited by Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson

© 2019

Inspired by the question of "what’s next?" in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history, this broadly historiographical volume represents a conversation among established and emerging scholars who share a commitment to understanding the past from intersectional feminist perspectives. It includes original essays on Quebecois, Indigenous, Black, and immigrant women’s histories and tackles such diverse topics as colonialism, religion, labour, warfare, sexuality, and reproductive labour and justice. Intended as a regenerative retrospective of a critically important field, this collection both engages analytically with the current state of women’s and gender historiography in Canada and draws on its rich past to generate new knowledge and areas for inquiry.

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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Gender and History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004330

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2019
    From: $34.95
    ISBN 9781442629714
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2019

    From: $26.21

    Regular Price: $34.95

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By putting past and present scholarship into dialogue with each other, this book addresses accomplishments in Canadian women’s and gender history, as well as ongoing silences and absences.

Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender History

Edited by Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson

© 2019

Inspired by the question of "what’s next?" in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history, this broadly historiographical volume represents a conversation among established and emerging scholars who share a commitment to understanding the past from intersectional feminist perspectives. It includes original essays on Quebecois, Indigenous, Black, and immigrant women’s histories and tackles such diverse topics as colonialism, religion, labour, warfare, sexuality, and reproductive labour and justice. Intended as a regenerative retrospective of a critically important field, this collection both engages analytically with the current state of women’s and gender historiography in Canada and draws on its rich past to generate new knowledge and areas for inquiry.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Gender and History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender History taps into the pulse of the ever evolving field of women, gender, and feminist studies in Canada with emphasis on diversity and the theoretical debates that are and have been at the heart of the discipline over a number of years. Featuring extraordinary and memorable essays, this volume fills an important gap by offering the state of Canadian women’s and gender history as well as proposing new directions for scholarly pursuit.”


    Carol Williams, History of Women and Gender Studies, University of Lethrbridge

    "This is an important and timely collection of original and thought-provoking historiographical essays. By tracing the theoretical and activist origins of the field and thoughtfully challenging historians to address ongoing silences, it makes a significant contribution to the diverse and rich field of gender and women’s history in Canada."


    Lara Campbell, Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, Simon Fraser University
  • Author Information

    Nancy Janovicek is an associate professor of History at the University of Calgary.


    Carmen Nielson is an associate professor of History at Mount Royal University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    1. Introduction: Feminist Conversations
    Nancy Janovicek, University of Calgary and Carmen Nielson, Mount Royal University

    2. Our Historiographical Moment: A Conversation about Indigenous Women’s History in Canada in the Early Twenty-First Century
    Mary Jane Logan McCallum, University of Winnipeg and Susan M. Hill, University of Toronto

    3. Writing Black Canadian Women’s History: Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going
    Karen Flynn, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Funké Aladejebi, University of New Brunswick

    4. Quebec Nationalism and the History of Women and Gender
    Denyse Baillargeon, Université de Montréal

    5. Class, Race, and Gender Roles in Early British North America
    Katherine M.J. McKenna, Western University

    6. Performative (Ir)rationality: Rethinking Agency in Canadian Histories of Gender, Religion, Reason, and Beyond
    Beth A. Robertson, Carleton University

    7. Home Fronts and Front Lines: A Gendered History of War and Peace
    Tarah Brookfield, Wilfrid Laurier University and Sarah Glassford, University of Ottawa

    8. Historical Feminisms in Canada to 1940: Further Reflections on the So-Called First Wave
    Nancy Forestell, St. Francis Xavier University

    9. Never Done: Feminists Reinterpret Their Own History
    Joan Sangster, Trent University

    10. Beyond Sisters or Strangers: Feminist Immigrant Women’s History and Rewriting Canadian History
    Marlene Epp, University of Waterloo and Franca Iacovetta, University of Toronto

    11. Primal Urge/National Force: Sex, Sexuality, and National History
    Heather Stanley, Vancouver Island University

    12. Challenging Work: Feminist Scholarship on Women, Gender, and Work in Canadian History
    Lisa Pasolli, Queen’s University and Julia Smith, University of Alberta

    13. Realizing Reproductive Justice in Canadian History
    Shannon Stettner, University of Waterloo, Kristin Burnett, Lakehead University, and Lori Chambers, Lakehead University

    List of Contributors
    Index

  • Read An Excerpt

    Introduction: Feminist Conversations

    Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson

    This collection began as a conversation between the co-editors about middle age. In reflecting on our own experiences, we made connections between our lives and the life course of women’s and gender history in Canada. We, like the field, were born in the late 1960s and early 1970s and could be perceived as both young and old, depending on one’s perspective. As our conversation drifted from the personal to the professional, we agreed that while Canadian women’s and gender history as a field was not as long-lived or well-established as national political history, for example, it is often talked about as if it were much more immature and fragmentary than it really is. Although several excellent essays that assessed the contours of women’s and gender history in northern North America have been written for international audiences, these unintentionally amplify the impression of a small field that can be apprehended in 10,000 words or less. We knew that Canadian women’s and gender history could sustain, and merited, a broadly historiographical volume of its own. And, as middle age inspires self-reflection, stock-taking, and contemplation of “what next?,” a collection of essays that coped with the field’s past and future seemed like an idea that’s time had come. We envisioned a book that captured the field’s continuities and identified discontinuities; offered a platform for established, mid-career, and emerging scholars to reflect on reading and writing Canadian women’s and gender history; and brought together the themes, issues, and questions that had animated the field over the long term. We also wanted to show the field’s maturity, extensiveness, variety, sophistication, and connectedness to international literature and theoretical perspectives.

    Our call for chapters prompted contributors to critically examine Canadian women’s and gender history from its first texts to its most recent contributions with the aim of generating new connections, vantage points, and knowledge about the field. The proposals we received exceeded our expectations, and we were inspired by the diverse ways the authors approached our questions. Most were co-authored, demonstrating that feminist history continues to be a collaborative scholarly endeavour. Since we wanted to preserve the contributors’ unique interpretations of their projects, we encouraged them to chart their own paths through the literature according to their particular interests and experience. Our objective as editors was to create an open platform for contributors to offer their critiques, judgments, and evaluations according to their own perspectives. What follows are not conventional historiographies.

    At the 2015 annual meeting of the Canadian Historical Association (CHA) in Ottawa, we hosted a one-day workshop for the contributors to share drafts, give each other feedback, and discuss the volume’s key themes. In this way, the book became a continuation of our initial conversation that extended to include the contributors. Those who could not be present video conferenced into the discussion. We talked about how various streams of women’s and gender history have informed each other, how to deepen the field by privileging diverse and marginalized voices, the ongoing disconnection between English and French historiography, and the potential for new directions. Our introduction to this collection is organized according to some of the themes arising out of our conversations that day: representation and meaningful inclusion in academe and in historical consciousness; the interconnections between feminist politics and the development of the field; and “recovery” history as an ongoing political project. A touchstone question guided our discussions: How can putting past and present historiography into dialogue with each other help us address the field’s ongoing silences and absences?

    Although the following chapters cover many of the major themes in Canadian women’s and gender history, there are some important areas of scholarship that have been left out. Politics, the law, family and domesticity, medicine, and education, for instance, have been topics of interest to women’s and gender historians since the field’s beginnings, but due to considerations of space or in the absence of viable proposals, these have not received sustained analysis here.

    There are also new topics and themes that have emerged relatively recently as distinct subfields – such as healthism and disability, body history, and the histories of affect and emotion – which are not represented but are acknowledged by several contributors as offering important theoretical and methodological insights that will shape future research. The impossibility of achieving anything approaching complete coverage in one volume offers only more evidence of the field’s breadth and extent.

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