Reading the Middle Ages, Volume I: Sources from Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic World, c.300 to c.1150, Second Edition

Edited by Barbara H. Rosenwein

© 2013

Spanning the period from c.300 to c.1150 and containing primary source material from the European, Byzantine, and Islamic worlds, Barbara H. Rosenwein's Reading the Middle Ages, Second Edition once again brings the Middle Ages to life. Building on the strengths of the first edition, this volume contains 20 new readings, including 8 translations commissioned especially for this book, and a stunning new 10-plate color insert entitled "Containing the Holy" that brings together materials from the Western, Byzantine, and Islamic religious traditions. Ancillary materials, including study questions, can be found on the History Matters website (www.utphistorymatters.com).

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Product Details

  • Division: Higher Education
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 8.0in x 0.7in x 10.0in
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  • PUBLISHED NOV 2013
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    ISBN 9781442606050
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Quick Overview

Spanning the period from c.300 to c.1150 and containing primary source material from the European, Byzantine, and Islamic worlds, Barbara H. Rosenwein's Reading the Middle Ages, Second Edition once again brings the Middle Ages to life.

Reading the Middle Ages, Volume I: Sources from Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic World, c.300 to c.1150, Second Edition

Edited by Barbara H. Rosenwein

© 2013

Spanning the period from c.300 to c.1150 and containing primary source material from the European, Byzantine, and Islamic worlds, Barbara H. Rosenwein's Reading the Middle Ages, Second Edition once again brings the Middle Ages to life. Building on the strengths of the first edition, this volume contains 20 new readings, including 8 translations commissioned especially for this book, and a stunning new 10-plate color insert entitled "Containing the Holy" that brings together materials from the Western, Byzantine, and Islamic religious traditions. Ancillary materials, including study questions, can be found on the History Matters website (www.utphistorymatters.com).

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Higher Education
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 8.0in x 0.7in x 10.0in
  • Reviews

    Beautifully written, thorough, and accessible, Reading the Middle Ages, Second Edition enables readers to consider medieval culture in its broadest sense. Overall, this text inspires a thoughtful examination and re-examination of the historical narrative of nearly 1200 years; it is geographically inclusive and historically comprehensive.
    Rosemary Drage Hale, Director of the Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Brock University

    This is a wonderfully broad selection of familiar and less familiar medieval sources. Beautifully and expertly presented, this collection of texts and images offers fresh and up-to-date insights into very different yet interconnected medieval worlds.
    Mayke de Jong, Utrecht University

    Barbara Rosenwein's Reading the Middle Ages, Second Edition treats us to a more multicultural and many-faceted period than was commonly studied years ago. Key literary and documentary texts from Western Europe retain their importance in this volume while a wealth of material from Central and Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia illuminates connections with the Western medieval world. The introductions to individual texts are engagingly written and often include questions that will prove helpful in guiding students and scholars alike in their reading.
    Joseph Grossi, University of Victoria
  • Author Information

    Barbara H. Rosenwein is Professor in the Department of History at Loyola University Chicago. She is the author of several books, including Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages (2006), Negotiating Space: Power, Restraint, and Privileges of Immunity in Early Medieval Europe (1999), and Reading the Middle Ages: Sources from Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic World (second edition, 2014).
  • Table of contents

    Preface
    Abbreviations and Symbols
    Abbreviations for the Authorized Version of the Bible

    Chapter 1: Prelude: The Roman World Transformed (c.300-c.600)

    A Christianized Empire
    1.1 Toleration or favoritism? Edict of Milan (313)
    1.2 Law: The Theodosian Code (438)
    1.3 Plague: Gregory the Great, Letter to Bishop Dominic of Carthage (600)

    Heresy and Orthodoxy
    1.4 Heretics: A Donatist Sermon (c.318)
    1.5 Orthodoxy's declaration: The Nicene Creed (325)

    Patristic Thought
    1.6 Relating this world to the next: Augustine, The City of God (413-426)
    1.7 Monasticism: The Benedictine Rule (c.530-c.560)

    Saintly Models
    1.8 The virginal life: Jerome, Letter 24 (To Marcella) (384)
    1.9 The eremetical life: Athanasius, Life of St. Antony of Egypt (357)
    1.10 The active life: Sulpicius Severus, The Life of St. Martin of Tours (397)
    1.11 St. Radegund as ascetic: Venantius Fortunatus, The Life of St. Radegund (before c.600)
    1.12 St. Radegund as relic collector: Baudonivia, The Life of St. Radegund (c.600)

    Barbarian Kingdoms
    1.13 Gothic Italy as Rome's heir: Cassiodorus, Variae (State Papers) (c.507-536)
    1.14 Gothic Spain converts: The Third Council of Toledo (589)
    1.15 Merovingian Gaul's bishop-historian: Gregory of Tours, History (576-594)
    Timeline for Chapter One

    Chapter 2: The Emergence of Sibling Cultures (c.600-c.750)

    The Resilience of Byzantium
    2.1 Byzantine village life and the education of a saint: The Life of St. Theodore of Sykeon (7th c.)
    2.2 The argument for icons: John of Damascus, On Holy Images (730s or early 750s)
    2.3 The iconoclastic argument: The Synod of 754
    2.4 Vilifying the iconoclasts: The Chronicle of Theophanes Confessor (before 818)

    The Formation of the Islamic World
    2.5 Pre-Islamic Arabic poetry: Al-A'sha, Bid Hurayra Farewell (before 625)
    2.6 The sacred text: Qur'an Suras 1, 53:1-18, 81, 87, 96, 98 (c.610-622)
    2.7 Umayyad diplomacy: The Treaty of Tudmir (713)
    2.8 Taxation: A Tax Demand in Egypt (710)
    2.9 Praising the caliph: Al-Akhtal, The Tribe Has Departed (c.692)

    The Impoverished but Inventive West
    2.10 A world explained by words: Isidore of Seville, Etymologies (c.615-c.630)
    2.11 A modern martyr in Francia: The Passion of Leudegar (680s)
    2.12 The settlement of disputes: Judgment of Childebert III (709 or 710)
    2.13 Reforming the Continental church: Letters to Boniface (723-726)
    2.14 Creating a Roman Christian identity for England: Bede, The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (731)
    Timeline for Chapter Two

    Chapter 3: Creating New Identities (c.750-c.900)

    The Material Basis of Society
    3.1 Manors in the West: Polyptyque of the Church of Saint Mary of Marseille (814-815)
    3.2 Byzantine guilds: The Book of the Prefect (886-912)
    Map 3.1 Major European Slave Exports (700-900)
    3.3 The sale of a slave in Italy: A Contract of Sale (725)

    The Abbasid Reconfiguration
    3.4 An early view of the Prophet: Muhammad ibn Ishaq, Life of Muhammad (754-767)
    3.5 Hadith: Al-Bukhari, On Fasting (9th c.)
    3.6 The "New Poetry": Abu Nuwas, Turning the Tables (c.800)

    Al-Andalus
    3.7 The minority—that is, Christian—view: Chronicle of Albelda (c.883)
    3.8 An Islamic Andalusian voice: Ibn 'Abd Rabbihi, I Have Never Seen (before 940)
    3.9 A Jewish poet in al-Andalus: Dunash ben Labrat, There Came a Voice (mid-10th c.)

    The Western Church and Empire
    3.10 The pope and the Carolingians: Pope Stephen II, Letters to King Pippin III (755-756)
    3.11 Charlemagne as Roman emperor: Einhard, Life of Charlemagne (825-826?)
    3.12 Modeling the state on Old Testament Israel: The Admonitio Generalis (789)
    3.13 Ideals of family and fidelity: Dhuoda, Handbook for Her Son (841-843)

    Expanding Christianity
    3.14 The Slavic conversion: Constantine/Cyril, Prologue to the Gospel (863-867)
    3.15 The Bulgarian Khan in Byzantine guise: Seal of Boris-Michael (864-889)
    3.16 The Bulgarians adopt Christianity: Pope Nicholas I, Letter to Answer the Bulgarians' Questions (866)
    Timeline for Chapter Three

    Chapter 4: Political Communities Reordered (c.900-c.1050)

    Regionalism: Its Advantages and Its Discontents
    4.1 Fragmentation in the Islamic world: Al-Tabari, The Defeat of the Zanj Revolt (c.915)
    4.2 The powerful in the Byzantine countryside: Romanus I Lecapenus, Novel (934)
    4.3 Donating to Cluny: Cluny's Foundation Charter (910) and various charters of donation (10th-11th c.)
    4.4 Love and complaints in Angouleme: Agreement between Count William of the Aquitanians and Hugh IV of Lusignan (1028)
    4.5 The Peace of God at Bourges: Andrew of Fleury, The Miracles of St. Benedict (1040-1043)
    4.6 A castellan's revenues and properties in Catalonia: Charter of Guillem Guifred (1041-1075)

    Byzantine Expansion
    4.7 Military life: Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus, Military Advice to His Son (950-958)
    4.8 Imperial rule: Michael Psellus, Portrait of Basil II (c.1063)

    Scholarship across the Islamic World
    4.9 Education: Al-Qabisi, A Treatise Detailing the Circumstances of Students and the Rules Governing Teachers and Students (before 1012)
    4.10 Political theory: Al-Farabi, The Perfect State (c.940-942)
    4.11 Logic: Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Treatise on Logic (1020s or 1030s)

    Kingdoms in East Central Europe
    4.12 Hungary as heir of Rome: King Stephen, Laws (1000-1038)
    4.13 Coming to terms with Catholic Poland: Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicle (1013-1018)
    4.14 Poland's self-image: Boleslaw's Coin (992-1000)
    4.15 Kievan Rus': The Russian Primary Chronicle (c.1113, incorporating earlier materials)

    Northern Europe
    4.16 An Ottonian courtier/bishop: Ruotger, Life of Bruno, Archbishop of Cologne (late 960s)
    4.17 Literacy: King Alfred, Prefaces to Gregory the Great's Pastoral Care (c.890)
    4.18 Law: King AEthelred, Law Code (1008)
    4.19 Christianity comes to Denmark: The Jelling Monument (960s)
    Timeline for Chapter Four

    Containing the Holy
    Plate 1 Dome of the Rock (692)
    Plate 2 Icon with Saint Demetrios (2nd half 10th c.)
    Plate 3 Reliquary Locket (10th-11th c.)
    Plate 4 Page from a Qur'an (993)
    Plate 5 A Holy Vestment (late 10th-early 11th c.)
    Plate 6 Tlemcen, Great Mosque (1236)
    Plate 7 The Church as Reliquary: Sainte-Chapelle (1248)
    Plate 8 Monstrance (c.1430)
    Plate 9 Synagogue and Ark (1435)
    Plate 10 The Wienhausen Sepulcher (15th c.)

    Reading Through Looking
    Plate 11 Seal of Boris-Michael (864-889)
    Plate 12 Boleslaw's Coin (992-1000)
    Plate 13 The Jelling Monument (960s)
    Plate 14 The Bayeux Tapestry (end of the 11th c.)
    Plate 15 Gabriel de Valseca, Portolan Map (1447)

    Chapter 5: The Expansion of Western Europe (c.1050-c.1150)

    Commercial Take Off
    5.1 Cultivating new lands: Frederick of Hamburg's Agreement with Colonists from Holland (1106)
    5.2 Ibn 'Abdun, Regulations for the Market at Seville (early 12th c.)
    5.3 The role of royal patronage: Henry I, Privileges for the Citizens of London (1130-1133)

    Church Reform
    5.4 The royal view: Henry IV, Letter to Gregory VII (1075)
    5.5 The papal view: Gregory VII, Letter to Hermann of Metz (1076)

    The Clergy in Action
    5.6 Vesting Prayers (c.1000?)
    5.7 The Star of Clerics (c.1200?)
    5.8 A Visitation Record (1268)

    The Crusades and Reconquista
    5.9 Martyrs in the Rhineland: Rabbi Eliezer b. Nathan ("Raban"), O God, Insolent Men (early to mid-12th c.)
    5.10 A Westerner in the Holy Land: Stephen of Blois, Letter to His Wife (March 1098)
    5.11 The Muslim reaction: Ibn al-Athir, The First Crusade (13th c.)
    5.12 The crusade in Spain and Portugal: The Conquest of Lisbon (1147-1148)

    The Norman Conquest of England
    5.13 The pro-Norman position: William of Jumieges, The Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans (c.1070)
    5.14 The native position: "Florence of Worcester," Chronicle of Chronicles (early 12th c.)
    5.15 The Conquest depicted: The Bayeux Tapestry (end of the 11th c.)
    5.16 Exploiting the Conquest: Domesday Book (1087)

    The Twelfth-Century Renaissance
    5.17 Logic: Abelard, Glosses on Porphyry (c.1100)
    5.18 Medical science: Constantine the African's translation of Johannitius's Isagoge (before 1098)
    5.19 The healing power of stones: Marbode of Rennes, The Book of Stones (? late 11th c.)

    Cluniacs and Cistercians
    5.20 The Cistercian view: St. Bernard, Apologia (1125)
    5.21 The Cluniac view: Peter the Venerable, Miracles (mid-1130s—mid-1150s)
    Timeline for Chapter Five

    Sources
    Index of Names, Places, and Readings