Boccaccio Revisited: Medieval Contexts and Global Interests

Edited by Olivia Holmes and Dana E. Stewart

© 2018

Reconsidering Boccaccio highlights the great Florentine writer Giovanni Boccaccio’s remarkable achievements in the fourteenth century as a cultural mediator, his exceptional social, geographic, and intellectual range, and the influence of his legacy on numerous cultural networks.

Grounded in Boccaccio’s own writings, Reconsidering Boccaccio brings a variety of methodologies and critical approaches to the works of one of the ‘three crowns’ of Italian literature. Containing essays by scholars not only of Italian literature, but also history, law, classics, and Middle Eastern literature, this collection is part of a vital movement to open up a dialogue among researchers in various areas of study  that touch on the works of Boccaccio. The volume highlights the necessity of a technical and historical framework when approaching Boccaccio studies, while also shedding new light on the lives of women and their role in the reception of Boccaccio’s works.

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Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004691

  • AVAILABLE JUN 2018

    From: $71.25

    Regular Price: $95.00

    ISBN 9781487501785
  • AVAILABLE JUL 2018

    From: $71.25

    Regular Price: $95.00

Quick Overview

Reconsidering Boccaccio explores the exceptional social, geographic, and intellectual range of the Florentine writer Giovanni Boccaccio, his dialogue with voices and traditions that surrounded him, and the way that his legacy illuminates the interconnectivity of numerous cultural networks.

Boccaccio Revisited: Medieval Contexts and Global Interests

Edited by Olivia Holmes and Dana E. Stewart

© 2018

Reconsidering Boccaccio highlights the great Florentine writer Giovanni Boccaccio’s remarkable achievements in the fourteenth century as a cultural mediator, his exceptional social, geographic, and intellectual range, and the influence of his legacy on numerous cultural networks.

Grounded in Boccaccio’s own writings, Reconsidering Boccaccio brings a variety of methodologies and critical approaches to the works of one of the ‘three crowns’ of Italian literature. Containing essays by scholars not only of Italian literature, but also history, law, classics, and Middle Eastern literature, this collection is part of a vital movement to open up a dialogue among researchers in various areas of study  that touch on the works of Boccaccio. The volume highlights the necessity of a technical and historical framework when approaching Boccaccio studies, while also shedding new light on the lives of women and their role in the reception of Boccaccio’s works.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Reconsidering Boccaccio is a substantial miscellany volume, featuring several extremely impressive contributors. Engaged with critical concerns beyond the narrow field of Boccaccio and source studies, Reconsidering Boccaccio will be of interest to scholars of comparative medieval French and Italian studies. With a focus on gender, particularly as it relates to women’s contributions to production and reception, Reconsidering Boccaccio also explores the importance of feminist response to Boccaccio’s work, and implicitly advances an argument for renewed attention."


    Guyda Armstrong, Department of Italian Studies, University of Manchester
  • Author Information

    Olivia Holmes is a professor of English and Medieval Studies in the Department of English and the Center for Medieval Studies and Renaissance at Binghamton University.


    Dana E. Stewart is an associate professor of Italian and Medieval Studies in the Department of Romance Languages and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Binghamton University.
  • Table of contents

    Olivia Holmes and Dana Stewart (Binghamton University), Introduction

    I MATERIAL CONTEXTS

    1. K. P. Clarke (University of York), “Text and (Inter)Face: The Catchwords in Boccaccio’s Autograph of the Decameron”

    2. Rhiannon Daniels (University of Bristol), “Reading Boccaccio’s Paratexts: Dedications as Thresholds between Worlds”

    II SOCIAL CONTEXTS: FRIENDSHIP

    3. Jason Houston (University of Oklahoma), “Boccaccio on Friendships (Theory and Practice)”

    4. Todd Boli (Independent Scholar), “Among Boccaccio’s Friends: A Profile of Mainardo Cavalcanti”

    III SOCIAL CONTEXTS: GENDER, MARRIAGE, AND THE LAW

    5. Alessia Ronchetti (University of Cambridge), “Reading Like a Woman: Gendering Compassion in the Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta”

    6. Grace Delmolino (Columbia University), “The Economics of Conjugal Debt from Gratian’s Decretum to Decameron 2.10: Boccaccio, Canon Law, and the Loss of Interest in Sex”

    7. Sara Diaz (Fairfield University), “Authority and Misogamy in Boccaccio’s Trattatello in laude di Dante”

    8. Mary Anne Case (University of Chicago Law School), “What Turns on Whether Women are Human for Boccaccio and Christine de Pizan?”

    IV POLITICAL AND AUTHORIAL CONTEXTS: ON FAMOUS WOMEN

    9. Elizabeth Casteen (Binghamton University), “On She-Wolves and Famous Women: Boccaccio, Politics, and the Neapolitan Court”

    10. Kevin Brownlee (University of Pennsylvania), “Christine Transforms Boccaccio: Gendered Authorship in the De mulieribus claris and the Cité des Dames”

    11. Lori Walters (Florida State University), “Reading like a Frenchwoman: Christine de Pizan’s Treatment of Boccaccio’s Johanna I and Andrea Acciaiu”

    V LITERARY INTERTEXTS

    12. Franklin Lewis (University of Chicago), “A Persian in a Pear Tree: Middle Eastern Analogues for Pirro/Pyrrhus”

    13. Katherine A. Brown (Princeton University), “Splitting Pants and Pigs: The Fabliau Barat et Haimet and Narrative Strategies in Decameron 8.5 and 8.6”

    14. Filippo Andrei (University of California, Berkeley), “The Tragicomedy of Lament: The Celestina and the Elegiac Legacy of Madonna Fiammetta”

    15. Nora Peterson (University of Nebraska–Lincoln), “Sins, Sex, and Secrets: The Legacy of Confession from the Decameron to the Heptaméron”