Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean

Edited by Barbara Fuchs and Emily Weissbourd

© 2015

Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean explores representations of national, racial, and religious identities within a region dominated by the clash of empires. Bringing together studies of English, Spanish, Italian, and Ottoman literature and cultural artifacts, the volume moves from the broadest issues of representation in the Mediterranean to a case study – early modern England – where the “Mediterranean turn” has radically changed the field.

The essays in this wide-ranging literary and cultural study examine the rhetoric which surrounds imperial competition in this era, ranging from poems commemorating the battle of Lepanto to elaborately adorned maps of contested frontiers. They will be of interest to scholars in fields such as history, comparative literary studies, and religious studies.

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Product Details

  • Series: UCLA Clark Memorial Library Series
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 296 pages
  • Illustrations: 12
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP003888

  • PUBLISHED APR 2015

    From: $50.25

    Regular Price: $67.00

    ISBN 9781442649026
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2015

    From: $50.25

    Regular Price: $67.00

Quick Overview

Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean explores representations of national, racial, and religious identities within a region dominated by the clash of empires.

Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean

Edited by Barbara Fuchs and Emily Weissbourd

© 2015

Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean explores representations of national, racial, and religious identities within a region dominated by the clash of empires. Bringing together studies of English, Spanish, Italian, and Ottoman literature and cultural artifacts, the volume moves from the broadest issues of representation in the Mediterranean to a case study – early modern England – where the “Mediterranean turn” has radically changed the field.

The essays in this wide-ranging literary and cultural study examine the rhetoric which surrounds imperial competition in this era, ranging from poems commemorating the battle of Lepanto to elaborately adorned maps of contested frontiers. They will be of interest to scholars in fields such as history, comparative literary studies, and religious studies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: UCLA Clark Memorial Library Series
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 296 pages
  • Illustrations: 12
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘This collection presents a great example of interdisciplinary synergy and verve. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students and scholars alike will benefit from its method and goals.’


    Lindsay Sidders
    Comitatus vol 47:2016

    ‘A fresh contribution to current scholarship on Mediterranean as a conceptual space… The multi-scale analysis reaches the editors’ goal of producing a nuanced and articulated picture of cross-religious interaction in the central-east Mediterranean.’


    Viviana Tagliaferri
    Nordicum Mediterraneum vol 11:01:2016

    ‘This volume is a worthwhile read for scholars of early modern empire… Well-researched, well-supported, well-written case studies that offer food for thought and future scholarship.’


    Dale Shuger
    Modern Philology vol 114:02:2016

    Representing Imperial Rivalry in the Early Modern Mediterranean makes a significant contribution to the growing area of Mediterranean studies in early modern criticism from a comparative perspective, bringing together new case studies that expand the archive of texts and evidence in this area.”


    Goran Stanivukovic, Department of English, Saint Mary’s University
  • Author Information

    Barbara Fuchs is a professor in the Departments of English and Spanish and Portuguese and the director of the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library and Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

    Emily Weissbourd is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of English at Bryn Mawr College.
  • Table of contents

    Part I. Envisioning Empire in the Old World

    1. The Mediterranean and Maritime Modernity (Ania Loomba)

    2. Mapping Trans-Imperial Ottoman Space: Movement, Genre, Temporality, Ethnography of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Palmira Brummett)

    3. Europe’s Turkish Nemesis (Larry Silver)

    4. The Houses of Habsburg and Osman: Rivals, Mirrors, Internecine Families (Carina Johnson)

    5. “The ruin and slaughter of … fellow Christians”: The French as Threat to Christendom in Spanish Assertions of Sovereignty in Italy, 1479–1516 (Andrew W. Devereux)

    6. Modern War, Ancient Form: Lessons from Lepanto for a Latin Seminar in Post-bellum Granada (Elizabeth R. Wright)

    7. Imperial Anxiety, the Roman Mirror, and the Neapolitan Academy of the Duke of Medinaceli, 1696–1701 (Thomas Dandelet)

    Part II. Imagining the Mediterranean in Early Modern England

    8. Meta-theater and the Mediterranean (Jane Degenhardt)

    9. Copying “the Anti-Spaniard”: Post-Armada Hispanophobia and English Renaissance Drama (Eric Griffin)

    10. The Spanish Empire in Webster's Italianate Drama (Emily Weissbourd)

    11. The Pope's Scholars: Papal Supremacy and the 1579 Student Revolt at the English College in Rome (Brian Lockey)

    12. Seeing Spain through Darkened Eyes: The Black Legend and Cornwallis’ Mission to Spain, 1605–1609 (William Goldman)

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