Saskatchewan: The Making of a University

By Arthur S. Morton; Edited by Carlyle King

© 1959

This volume tells the story of the University from its beginning to the end of its first and most formative period in 1919-20. At his death in 1945, Professor Arthur S. Morton left uncompleted a manuscript of a history of the University; and from his material Dr. Carlyle King has extracted and assembled this book. During the preparation of the manuscript, Professor Morton secured the collaboration of his long-time colleagues in furnishing memoranda about particular aspects of University history, and was in constant communication with Dr. Murray, who provided for his use letters and documents, gave him access to the proceedings of the Board of Governors, and drew upon his personal recollections.
Professor Morton’s expressed intention in undertaking the history was to give “a clear exposition of the principles on which the University was founded and by which it has been governed.” As Dr. King points out, this intention is realized within the framework of the present book. In the nineteen-twenties the University entered upon a new period of expanding services, but its development proceeded along lines of administrative and education policy that had been firmly laid down by its founders and early leaders.
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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 134 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005787

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1959

    From: $14.21

    Regular Price: $18.95

    ISBN 9781487578831
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1959

    From: $14.21

    Regular Price: $18.95

Quick Overview

This volume tells the story of the University from its beginning to the end of its first and most formative period in 1919-20. At his death in 1945, Professor Arthur S. Morton left uncompleted a manuscript of a history of the University; and from his material Dr. Carlyle King has extracted and assembled this book.

Saskatchewan: The Making of a University

By Arthur S. Morton; Edited by Carlyle King

© 1959

This volume tells the story of the University from its beginning to the end of its first and most formative period in 1919-20. At his death in 1945, Professor Arthur S. Morton left uncompleted a manuscript of a history of the University; and from his material Dr. Carlyle King has extracted and assembled this book. During the preparation of the manuscript, Professor Morton secured the collaboration of his long-time colleagues in furnishing memoranda about particular aspects of University history, and was in constant communication with Dr. Murray, who provided for his use letters and documents, gave him access to the proceedings of the Board of Governors, and drew upon his personal recollections.
Professor Morton’s expressed intention in undertaking the history was to give “a clear exposition of the principles on which the University was founded and by which it has been governed.” As Dr. King points out, this intention is realized within the framework of the present book. In the nineteen-twenties the University entered upon a new period of expanding services, but its development proceeded along lines of administrative and education policy that had been firmly laid down by its founders and early leaders.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 134 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    ARTHUR S. MORTON was educated at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Berlin. An ordained minister, he was pastor of various churches in New Brunswick; then became lecturer in Church History at the Presbyterian College, Halifax at Knox College, Toronto. He was professor of history and librarian at the University of Saskatchewan from 1914 to 1940. Following his retirement, he was Provincial Archivist until his death in 1945. He was the author of many books and articles, among them his monumental pioneer work A History of the Canadian West to 1870-71.

    CARLYLE KING graduated from the University of Saskatchewan, and obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. He has been a member of the English Department of the University of Saskatchewan since 1929, and Bateman Professor and Head of the Department since 1950. He has published numerous literary articles, and edited in 1955 a collection of Canadian writing about Saskatchewan entitled.