Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse

By Jim Ellis

© 2003

Based for the most part on Ovid's Metamorphoses, epyllia retell stories of the dalliances of gods and mortals, most often concerning the transformation of beautiful youths. This short-lived genre flourished and died in England in the 1590s. It was produced mainly by and for the young men of the Inns of Court, where the ambitious came to study law and to sample the pleasures London had to offer. Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses.

Examining both the most famous (Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis and Marlowe's Hero and Leander) and some of the more obscure examples of the genre (Hiren, the Fair Greek and The Metamorphosis of Tabacco), Ellis moves from considering fantasies of selfhood, through erotic relations with others, to literary affiliation, political relations, and finally to international issues such as exploration, settlement, and trade. Offering a revisionist account of the genre of the epyllion, Ellis transforms theories of sexuality, literature, and politics of the Elizabethan age, making an erudite and intriguing contribution to the field.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP002083

  • PUBLISHED AUG 2003

    From: $60.75

    Regular Price: $81.00

    ISBN 9780802087355
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2003

    From: $70.50

    Regular Price: $94.00

Quick Overview

Offering a revisionist account of the genre of the epyllion, Ellis transforms theories of sexuality, literature, and politics of the Elizabethan age, making an erudite and intriguing contribution to the field.

Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse

By Jim Ellis

© 2003

Based for the most part on Ovid's Metamorphoses, epyllia retell stories of the dalliances of gods and mortals, most often concerning the transformation of beautiful youths. This short-lived genre flourished and died in England in the 1590s. It was produced mainly by and for the young men of the Inns of Court, where the ambitious came to study law and to sample the pleasures London had to offer. Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses.

Examining both the most famous (Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis and Marlowe's Hero and Leander) and some of the more obscure examples of the genre (Hiren, the Fair Greek and The Metamorphosis of Tabacco), Ellis moves from considering fantasies of selfhood, through erotic relations with others, to literary affiliation, political relations, and finally to international issues such as exploration, settlement, and trade. Offering a revisionist account of the genre of the epyllion, Ellis transforms theories of sexuality, literature, and politics of the Elizabethan age, making an erudite and intriguing contribution to the field.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    'Sexuality and Citizenship approaches an important but neglected genre of Elizabethan poetry in a fresh and insightful way ... It also synthesizes and extends a considerable body of recent research done on the relationship between forms of literature, forms of subjectivity, and forms of politics in other areas of early modern studies. The work is a valuable contribution to one of the dominant debates in early modern studies.'


    Mathew Martin, Department of English, Brock University
  • Author Information

    Jim Ellis is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Calgary.

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